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View of the Shannon Bay Cannery from the bow of a boat approaching the cannery.

Shannon Bay was built on the Masset Inlet, a prime area for the pink salmon fishery. Gulf of Georgia Cannery Collection G2010.027.047

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Shannon Bay Cannery

Before 1911 B.C. salmon canneries focused almost entirely on Sockeye salmon. After 1911 the canning industry began to can other species of salmon. Canneries were built in new areas along the B.C. coast including this one on Haida Gwaii.

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Canadian Fishing Company Home Plant buildings with fishing vessels around the building.

Canadian Fishing Company Ltd.’s Home Plant at the foot of Gore Street in Vancouver, 1965. Image 10557 courtesy of the Vancouver Public Library.

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Home Plant

Home Plant refers to the head office and main plant of the Canadian Fishing Company (Canfisco), one of the larger and longest operating fishing companies in B.C.

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Cannery buildings, wharves and boats.

Great Northern Cannery, 1920, Image CVA-SFN-1547 courtesy of the City of Vancouver Archives.

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Great Northern Cannery | Defiance

Great Northern Cannery is an example of a plant that saw its success improve when it started canning Chum salmon.

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The Imperial Cannery complex in the distance with the Fraser River in the foreground

One of many canneries purchased by BC Packers in 1902, Imperial quickly became one of the largest. Image C-04950 courtesy of the Royal BC Museum and Archives.

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Imperial Cannery

Imperial Cannery was the largest and longest operating cannery on the Steveston waterfront. It was the Fraser River headquarters for BC Packers Ltd.

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Red label features imagery of swimming salmon, coins, and a lion.

Ewen & Co. Lion Brand label. Image I-61369 courtesy of the Royal BC Museum and Archives.

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Ewen Cannery | Lion Island

Lion Island canned salmon was a house-hold item in Great Britain, Australia and New Zealand.

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Can label for "Fresh Fraser River salmon packed by J.S. Deas. Fraser River, British Columbia." Label includes an illustration of a salmon in front of an idyllic stream scene.

Deas commissioned his labels from Grafton Tyler Brown, the first Black printer and painter from Oregon. Image I-61591 courtesy of the Royal BC Museum and Archives

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Deas Island Cannery | BC Canning | Finlay, Durham, & Brodie

The Deas Island Cannery was established in 1873 by tinsmith John Sullivan Deas, and Alexander Loggie. At the time, Deas was not only an industry leader but the only African American working in the B.C. canning industry.

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Cannery buildings in the distance with the Fraser River in the foreground.

Ewen and Co.’s Salmon Cannery near New Westminster, 1887. William McFarlane Notman, Image  VIEW-1781 courtesy of McCord Museum.

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Annieville Cannery

Fish canning in British Columbia started at Annieville Cannery in 1870.

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Many fishing boats and racked nets are visible in the harbour. Gulf of Georgia Cannery buildings in the background.

Boats and net racks with nets, Steveston BC. Gulf of Georgia Cannery Collection courtesy of the Canadian Fishing Company CFC 3-13-1

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Gulf of Georgia Cannery

The Gulf of Georgia Cannery was the largest on the coast in the boom years of canning from 1895 to 1902. Because of this, it earned the nick-name “The Monster Cannery”.

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Britannia Shipyards buildings at low tide with grasses in the foreground.

Britannia Shipyards, Richmond BC, 1973. Image 1996 13 54 courtesy of the City of Richmond Archives

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Britannia Cannery

Britannia started as a cannery but is better known today as an historical shipyard, and a National Historic Site.

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Green label features the image of a salmon and the words "Sunflower Talls. Todds British Columbia Salmon packed by J.H. Todd and Sons Ltd. Victoria B.C."

One pound salmon can label from the Todd & Son’s Sunflower Brand. Gulf of Georgia Cannery Society Archives G2009.013.012

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Empire Cannery

Empire became the main cannery for the Victoria-based J.H. Todd & Sons.

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CeePeeCee Cannery buildings viewed from the water with fishing boats moored at the docks.

Ceepeecee Cannery complex included a reduction plant, a two-storey staff house, a number of houses and apartments, bunkhouses, a cookhouse, and a store. Image I-28367 courtesy of the Royal BC Museum and Archives

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Ceepeecee Cannery

Not all canneries focused on salmon. The Ceepeecee Cannery is an example of a plant that focused on pilchards even after the addition of a salmon canning line.

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Steam rising from the buildings of the Nitnat Cannery.

Nitinat Cannery, 1929, Image BC_1532_1369_009 courtesy of UBC Special Collections

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Nitinat Cannery

Nitinat was a successful cannery for a decade but was forced to close when over-fishing caused a shortage of the once abundant Chum salmon in the area.

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Workers washing fish at the St. Jean's Cannery

The 2017 sliming table at the St. Jean’s cannery. Gulf of Georgia Cannery Society Archives, image courtesy of Sheldon Nider.

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St. Jean’s Cannery

St. Jean's Cannery in Nanaimo is the last remaining commercial cannery in British Columbia. It operates on a smaller scale than the historic salmon canneries.

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Blue building with two rows of large windows facing the water. Fishing boats in the foreground.

Seine Loft at Quathiaski, 1982, Image 2001 34 3-435 courtesy of the City of Richmond Archives

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Quathiaski Cannery | Pidcock | Anderson’s

Quathiaski Cannery's story is an excellent example of how canneries contributed to the growth of communities in remote areas along the B.C. Coast.

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Passenger vessel docked at the Namu cannery. The words "Clover Leaf finest quality salmon" and "Rupert Brand" are painted on the side of the cannery building.

Namu Cannery was the site of one of B.C. Packers largest year-round operations. Both Rupert Brand and Cloverleaf products were canned at this large cannery. Gulf of Georgia Cannery Society Archives G2003.047.004L

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Namu Cannery

The Namu Cannery was more than a fish processing plant. It had a school, a recreation hall, and numerous residences for its year-round staff.

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Can label for "Rivers Inlet selected fresh salmon, Viceroy Brand packed by the British Columbia Canning Co. Ltd. Nooquilts Lake."

The British Columbia Canning Co. created the Viceroy Brand to appeal to British consumers. They used images of soldiers in red coats and of majestic landscapes to appeal to overseas buyers. Image I-61603 courtesy of the Royal BC Museum and Archives.

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Rivers Inlet Cannery | R.I.C.

R.I.C. was the first cannery to be established in Rivers Inlet, which had the third largest sockeye run after the Fraser and Skeena Rivers.

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Good Hope Cannery with boats moored at the docks and net barrels on the wharf.

Good Hope Cannery, c. 1918-1928. Photo by James Crookall. Image CVA-260-1194.120 courtesy of the City of Vancouver Archives.

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Good Hope Cannery

As the canning industry declined, most cannery buildings were torn down or left to rot. Good Hope Cannery provides an example of how some fish canneries were repurposed. Some canneries became fresh fish plants and others were used fishing camps for other canneries. Good Hope is one of the few examples that became a luxury fishing lodge.

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Wharf at the Butedale cannery village. Signs on the main building read "Butedale" and " The Canadian Fishing Co. Ltd."

The Canadian Fishing Company buildings and docks at Butedale, 1946. Image I-28254 courtesy of the Royal BC Museum and Archives

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Butedale Cannery

Cannery buildings at Butedale had to be lashed to the shore as piles could not be driven into the sea floor.

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Many wooden canoes are pulled up onto a long curving beach with buildings in the background.

Dugout canoes line the beach at the Metlakatla village. The Metlakatla Cannery and other industrial buildings are in the background. Image B-03571 courtesy of the Royal BC Museum and Archives

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Metlakatla Cannery

The Metlakatla Cannery is an example of how B.C.'s canning industry impacted Indigenous communities.

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Cannery housing at the North Pacific Cannery.

A row of cannery housing at the North Pacific Cannery in 2016, looking toward the canning facilities. Gulf of Georgia Cannery Society Archives

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North Pacific Cannery

North Pacific Cannery represents the unique history of canning in northern B.C. The site is now a National Historic Site and operates as a museum to share the stories of remote northern cannery life.

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Cannery buildings with a treed hill in the background.

Carlisle Cannery buildings on pilings above the Skeena River. Gulf of Georgia Cannery Society Archives G2010.027.004

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Carlisle Cannery

The Carlisle Cannery had can-making machinery that supplied the surrounding canneries of the area.

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The Oceanside Cannery with docks and fishing boats in the foreground. The building is painted with the words "British Columbia Packers Limited Prince Rupert Plant."

The Oceanside plant, Prince Rupert. Gulf of Georgia Cannery Society Archives G2011.003.175

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New Oceanside Cannery

The closure of New Oceanside Cannery in 2015 represented the end of large-scale commercial salmon canning in B.C.

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Four men stand in front of five open, empty retorts.

Retorts at the Cunningham Cannery. Prince Rupert City & Regional Archives & Museum of Northern BC, Wrathall Collection, WP996-69-11052

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Cunningham Cannery | Skeena

Robert Cunningham built a canning facility in his name in 1883 which was considered ahead of its time.

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Cannery buildings cover the land in the foreground. Mountains are visible across the water in the background.

Aerial view of the village of Port Simpson. Courtesy of the North Pacific Cannery, P984.129.4

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Port Simpson Cannery

The Port Simpson Cannery was funded by the Federal Government as an economic initiative for First Nations peoples of the North Coast.

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Mill Bay Cannery buildings on pilings above the Nass River with many small fishing vessels at the wharf. 

Gas powered fishing boats load their nets from the tanks lining the wharf at the Mill Bay Cannery, 1935. Image E-02091 courtesy of the Royal BC Museum and Archives.

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Mill Bay Cannery | BC Cannery

The Mill Bay Cannery became a model for future canneries.

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Cannery buildings at Wales Island.

The Wales Island Cannery on the Pearse Canal, 1927. Gulf of Georgia Cannery Collection courtesy of the Canadian Fishing Company.

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Wales Island Cannery

Wales Island Cannery's story is unique because it began as an American cannery and became a Canadian cannery when the border was established.

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Cans are stacked to the rafters inside a wooden building.

Can loft at an unknown cannery. Gulf of Georgia Cannery Society Archives G2002.003.001aa

Westminster Cannery | Lam Tung

1896-1903

49°11'59.4"N 122°55'36.8"W
  • Built in 1896 in New Westminster by the New Westminster Packing Co.
  • Also known as the Lam Tung Cannery after the company principal Sam (or Lam) Tung
  • It was one of two canneries to survive the New Westminster fire of 1898
  • Purchased by BC Packers Association in 1902 and closed the following year
Hundreds of chum salmon lying on the floor of a cannery.

Salmon on receiving floor of an unknown cannery. Gulf of Georgia Cannery Society Archives 1998.006.002/8

Westham Island Cannery

1896-1902

49°04'21.4"N 123°08'53.3"W
  • Built in 1896 on Westham Island on the Fraser River by the Westham Island Packing Co. on land leased from H. Trimm
  • Acquired and closed by BC Packers Association in 1902
Fisherman is hoisting a salmon with a peugh. Standing on the side of a small gillnetter

Fishing salmon on the Fraser River, 1952. Image I-27850 courtesy of the Royal BC Museum and Archives.

Western Fisheries Cannery

1897

49°12'00.2"N 122°54'37.9"W
  • Built in 1897 in New Westminster by Western Fisheries
  • Operated for only one season
  • Destroyed in the New Westminster fire of 1898
West Coast Packing Co. Cannery buildings in the distance.

The West Coast Packing Co. Cannery on the west coast of Vancouver Island, 1896. Image I-31567 courtesy of the Royal BC Museum and Archives.

West Coast Cannery

1896

49°38'34.3"N 126°18'43.8"W
  • Built in 1896 on the west coast of Vancouver Island by the West Coast Packing Co.
  • Operated for only one season
Salmon can label for the Wellington Packing Co. Text: "British Columbia salmon Fraser River. Victoria Canning Co. of British Columbia," set against images of a salmon and a British soldier.

This 1901 can label uses Canadian stereotypes to tell a story to consumers overseas. Image I-61116 courtesy of the Royal BC Museum and Archives

Wellington Cannery

1880-1902

49°05'07.0"N 123°07'15.7"W
  • Built in 1880 at Canoe Pass on the Fraser River by the Victoria Canning Co.
  • Acquired and closed by BC Packers Association in 1902
  • Site never re-opened as a cannery, although some of the buildings were used as a slaughterhouse in 1940
Fish elevator at the Watun River Cannery. "Watun River Cannery" is painted on a sign on one of the buildings.

Conveyor belts lead from the docks to the main building at the Watun River Cannery. Gulf of Georgia Cannery Society Archives 1997.009.033

Watun River Cannery | Woden River

1919-1930

53°54'51.3"N 132°06'15.7"W
  • Established in 1919 by Wallace Fisheries by relocating cannery buildings from Naden Harbour to Watun River in the Haida Gwaii archipelago
  • Wallace Fisheries was acquired by BC Fishing and Packing Co. in 1926
  • The plant was not considered profitable and closed in 1930
The Wannuck Cannery complex photographed from across the water.

The Wannuck Cannery complex, just east of Brunswick cannery in Rivers Inlet. Ca 1930. Image B-06880 courtesy of the Royal BC Museum and Archives.

Wannock Cannery | Wannuck

1884-1902

51°38'41.9"N 127°30'21.5"W
  • Built in 1884 at the Wannock River in Rivers Inlet by the Wannock Packing Co.
  • Acquired by the Victoria Canning Co. in 1892
  • Bought by BC Packers Association in 1902 and canning operations ended
  • Site was abandoned in 1934 and the property was used as a summer hospital for Rivers Inlet
The Walker Lake Cannery viewed from the land behind the cannery with Johnstone Channel visible behind the buildings.

Walker Lake Cannery buildings, 1928. Image BC_1532_1369_014 courtesy of UBC Special Collections

Walker Lake Cannery

1927-1929

52°13'50.7"N 127°53'45.5"W
  • Built in 1927 in the Johnstone Channel by the BC Fishing & Packing Co.
  • The cannery burned down in 1929 and was not rebuilt
  • Site operated an ice plant from 1930-1940
Wadhams cannery building with the company name, "Wadhams," in enormous lettering on the roof. Net tanks line the wharf in the foreground

Wadhams Cannery on Rivers Inlet, 1948. Photo from the Walter Cadwaller Collection, Gulf of Georgia Cannery Society Archives G2001.009.006A

Wadhams Cannery – Rivers Inlet

1897-1942

51°30'44.8"N 127°31'17.5"W
  • Built in 1897 at Rivers Inlet by E.A. Wadhams
  • Acquired by BC Packers Association in 1902
  • Can-making equipment was installed in 1916
  • Canning ceased in 1942 after fire destroyed the net loft and the office
  • Now operates as a fishing lodge
Can label for Wadhams Cannery featuring large salmon image. It reads: "Extra choice salmon cutlet. Packed at Wadhams' Cannery Fraser River, B.C. by the Anglo British Columbia Packing Co. Ltd."

Wadhams Cannery label, 1900. Image I-61335 courtesy of the Royal BC Museum and Archives

Wadhams Cannery – Fraser River

1883–c.1925

49°05'30.3"N 123°05'24.0"W
  • Built on the Fraser River in 1883 by E.A. Wadhams
  • Absorbed by the Anglo-British Columbia Packers in 1891
  • Ceased operation and dismantled by 1925
The end of a wooden dock with seagulls perched on the pilings

Seagulls on an unknown cannery dock. Gulf of Georgia Cannery Society Archives G2001.009.019B.

Victoria Cannery – Wannock River

1883 - unknown date

51°40'19.6"N 127°15'42.7"W
  • Built in 1883 at the mouth of the Wannock River at Rivers Inlet by the BC Canning Co.
  • Built across from the Rivers Inlet Cannery on the site of a sawmill
Rivers Inlet and surrounding land. Text in the bottom right side of the image reads "Copyright 1927 Pacific Airways Ltd. Vancouver B.C."

Aerial photograph of Rivers Inlet, taken in 1927, showing several cannery locations. Image 2001-34-9-456 courtesy of the City of Richmond Archives.

Vancouver Cannery | Green’s – Rivers Inlet

1897-1902

51°37'46.2"N 127°33'15.5"W
  • Built in 1897 at Rivers Inlet by the Canadian Canning Co.
  •  Acquired and closed by BC Packers Association in 1902, used as boat storage
  •  In 1906 the land was donated to the Methodist Church as a site for the Rivers Inlet Branch Hospital
Vancouver cannery on the Fraser River with sailboats moored in front

The Vancouver Cannery rises above the middle arm of the Fraser River, 1912. Image E-00105 courtesy of the Royal BC Museum and Archives.

Vancouver Cannery

1896-1930

49°11'10.6"N 123°12'17.1"W
  • Built in 1896 at the North Arm of the Fraser River on Sea Island by the Canadian Canning Co.
  • Bought by Gosse Millerd Packing Co. in 1914
  • Closed in 1930
  • Used as a fishing camp for Imperial Cannery 1935-1936
Portion of a newspaper article with the title "Salmon with a Strike Relief Label" and a photo of male workers in a cannery

The Tulloch-Western cannery on the Vancouver waterfront canned as an independent company during the 1959 UFAWU strike, and sold the cans in support of the strike efforts. Gulf of Georgia Cannery Society Archives (the Fisherman Newspaper)

Tulloch-Western Cannery

1946 - unknown date

49°17'33.1"N 123°03'18.1"W
  • Built in 1946 and operated in Vancouver by an independent company, Tulloch-Western
  • Canned salmon during the 1959 general strike when fishers were prevented by the government from selling their fish at the docks
  • During the strike, the canned salmon from this plant had a "Strike Relief" label
Cannery buildings on pilings over the water.

The Tuck Inlet Cannery, Image P981.69.1 courtesy of the North Pacific Cannery.

Tuck Inlet Cannery | Prince Rupert

1913-1939

54°21'37.0"N 130°16'48.0"W
  • Built in 1913 and operated by the Atlin Construction Company at Tuck Inlet
  • First cannery and cold storage plant in the Prince Rupert area
  • Changed hands five times before being purchased by Nelson Brothers Fisheries in 1931
  • Reduction plant was added in 1937
  • Plant closed in 1939 in favour of a new cannery built on the ocean dock in Prince Rupert
Docks and fishing boats and the Tofino Fish Camp.

Tofino Camp, 1990, Image 2001 34 3 606 courtesy of the City of Richmond Archives.

Tofino Cannery

1962-c.1985

49°09'19.3"N 125°54'33.4"W
  • Established in 1962 at Tofino on Vancouver Island by Andy Tulloch of the Tofino Packing Co.
  • Sold to the Canadian Fishing Co. in 1976
  • Acquired by BC Packers Ltd. in 1980, ran until the mid-1980s
  • Processed shrimp as well as salmon
Gold Ring Brand fresh salmon label for "Fraser River British Columbia fresh salmon Terra Nova Canning Co., Gold Ring Brand."

This salmon label from c. 1900 features elements that were common at the time, such as bold type, bright colours and illustrations. Image I-61288 courtesy of the Royal BC Museum and Archives

Terra Nova Cannery

1892-1927

49°10'32.8"N 123°11'48.8"W
  • Built in 1892 on the Fraser River on the north side of Lulu Island in Richmond by the Terra Nova Canning Co.
  • Acquired by BC Packers Association in 1902
  • Operated until 1927
  • Later used as a camp for Imperial Cannery and as a central net loft for making large seine nets
Docks and net racks at the Tallheo Cannery.

Tallheo Cannery dock, c. 1930s, Image CVA 374-220 Courtesy of the City of Vancouver Archives.

Tallheo Cannery | Nieumiamus

1917-1948

52°23'23.4"N 126°50'05.0"W
  • Established in Burke Channel in 1917 as the Nieumiamus Cannery by Bella Coola entrepreneur B.F. Jacobsen
  • Ownership transferred to Northern B.C. Fisheries soon after, renamed Tallheo
  • Property was sold to the Canadian Fishing Co. in 1925
  • Operated as a cannery until 1948 and was used as a gillnet camp after 1951
  • Was sold in the 1980s to a resident of Bella Coola and is now the Tallheo Cannery Guest House
View of complete Sunnyside cannery complex, including workers housing on the shore line, docks with net racks and tanks, and with cannery buildings in the background.

Sunnyside Cannery complex, Gulf of Georgia Cannery Society Archives 1999.014.001.007-10

Sunnyside Cannery

1916-1968

54°11'11.2"N 130°11'51.5"W
  • Built in 1916 on the Inverness Passage of the Skeena River by Gosse-Millerd Co. Ltd.
  • The large cannery complex included a school and a church
  • Purchased by BC Packers Ltd. in 1934 and upgraded in 1950
  • Highway 16 extended to the cannery in 1959
  • Last year of canning was 1968
Scale drawing of Strathcona Cannery complex

Complete fire plan for the Stratchona Cannery complex from 1923, with buildings and watersources identified. Gulf of Georgia Cannery Society Archives G2009.016 Plan 150.

Strathcona Cannery

1906-1928

51°32'23.7"N 127°30'57.2"W
  • Built in 1906 in Rivers Inlet by the Strathcona Packing Co.
  • Purchased by Wallace Fisheries in 1911 for $150,000
  • Acquired and closed by BC Packers Ltd. in 1928
Expanse of burnt pilings stretch along the waterfront with cannery buildings in the background.

Charred pilings of the Lighthouse, Steveston and Star Canneries after the fire of 1918, with the Gulf of Georgia Cannery in the background. Image 1971-1-242 courtesy City of Richmond Archives

Steveston Cannery

1905-1907

49°07'26.9"N 123°11'04.8"W
  • Built in 1905 in Steveston by the Steveston Canning Co.
  • This was the second cannery built on the Steveston waterfront with this name - the first was better known as "Lighthouse Cannery"
  • Built directly between the Star and Lighthouse canneries
  • Closed in 1907
  • The buildings were destroyed by the Steveston Fire of 1918
The Steveston waterfront with many cannery faces visible.

The Star Cannery was first in a row of canneries that lined the Steveston waterfront. Gulf of Georgia Cannery Society Archives G2005.046.023

Star Cannery

1895-1917

49°07'27.6"N 123°11'09.1"W
  • Built in 1895 in Steveston by the Star Packing Co.
  • Destroyed by fire in its first year but rebuilt in time for the canning season
  • Purchased by the Canadian Canning Co. in 1899
  • The Steveston Fire of 1918 started in a bunkhouse at the Star Cannery
  • Not rebuilt after the fire
Standard Cannery buildings visible in the distance along a wooded river bank.

Standard Cannery, Skeena River, c. 1890s Robert Reford, Library and Archives Canada, PA-118172

Standard Cannery | Port Irving

1889-1902

54°00'01.1"N 130°06'01.6"W
  • Established in 1889 at Port Irving by Captain John Irving and Associates
  • Sold to the Victoria Canning Co. in 1892
  • Housed can-making facilities and made their own wooden shipping crates
  • Acquired by BC Packers Association in 1902 and closed that same year, possibly due to its unfavourable location
  • Served as a fish camp for Balmoral Cannery and later for Claxton Cannery
Worker stoops by crates with fresh fish on the floor in the foreground

Interior of St. Mungo cold storage, Fraser River c. 1903. Image 825 courtesy New Westminster Archives

St. Mungo Cannery

1899-1921 and 1931-1957

49°09'33.5"N 122°56'21.6"W
  • Built in 1899 near Sunbury, North Delta, by the St. Mungo Fish Packing Co.
  • Operated until 1921
  • Re-opened in 1931 by Sunbury Packers Ltd.
  • Purchased by Nelson Brothers Fisheries in 1933
  • Primarily produced half pound sockeye ovals packed under contract for an English buyer
  • After 1957 the site was used for net storage
Fishing boats moored at a dock.

Haida Gwaii, 1945. Image I-22208 courtesy of the Royal BC Museum and Archives.

South Bay Cannery

1926-1931

53°09'12.1"N 132°05'24.0"W
  • Established in 1926 on Moresby Island in the Haida Gwaii archipelago by the BC Fishing & Packing Co.
  • Built to take advantage of the pink salmon run which occurred on even-numbered years
  • In 1928 the cold storage building was lost in a gale in the Hecate Strait while being transported by scow
  • Closed in 1931 by BC Packers Ltd.
Wooden structures built in the water stretch across the harbour.

The Sooke Harbour fish traps extended across the harbour, and were extremely profitable. Image B-03640 courtesy of the Royal BC Museum and Archives.

Sooke Harbour Fishing and Packing Co. Cannery

1918-1922

48°22'09.7"N 123°43'33.4"W
  • Built in 1918 at Sooke Harbour on southern Vancouver Island by the Sooke Harbour Fishing and Packing Co., an American company from Port Townsend
  • Processed salmon that were caught in the Sooke Harbour fish traps
  • Amalgamated in 1922 with J.H. Todd & Sons and became a subsidiary company
  • After 1922 J.H. Todd & Sons closed the cannery and salmon were transported to Empire Cannery in Esquimalt for processing
Scale drawing of cannery buildings.

Complete fire plan for the Somerville Cannery complex from 1923, with buildings and watersources identified. Cannery housing wraps all the way around to the other side of the bay. Gulf of Georgia Cannery Society Archives G2009.016 Plan 39.

Somerville Cannery

1918-1924

54°59'07.4"N 129°41'02.4"W
  • Built in 1918 by the BC Fishing & Packing Co.
  • Land leased on the site of the former Douglas Cannery on the Portland Inlet on the Nass River
  • Francis Millerd leased the plant in 1923
  • Closed in 1924
  • Site was purchased by Wallace Fisheries in 1926, and taken over by British Columbia Packers Ltd. the same year but never reopened
Fishing skiffs lined up in front of cannery buildings.

Sommerville Cannery, Sointula, 1926. Image BC_1532_1329_005 courtesy of UBC Special Collections

Sointula Cannery

1924-1929

50°37'53.4"N 127°01'49.3"W
  • Established in 1924 by Francis Millerd of the Somerville Cannery Co.
  • Cannery was built on Malcolm Island, at the site of a former Finnish commune
  • Acquired by BC Packers Ltd. in 1928
  • Plant closed in 1929 due to proximity to other cannery at Alert Bay also owned by BC Packers
Two men stand at the top of steps leading into the wooden cannery building

View of Smith’s Inlet Cannery showing Jack Hoxbridge (at left) July 1928 UBC-BC_1532_1369_005.

Smith Inlet Cannery | Hickey’s

1902-1931

51°18'22.7"N 127°22'30.8"W
  • Built at Smith Inlet by William Hickey and B.C. Liberal leader R. Kelly (Wm Hickey Canning Co.)
  • Hickey had purchased exclusive drag-seining rights
  • The company paid rent to BC Packers Association, who owned the land
  • BC Packers Association raised the rent several times and even tried fencing off the land in attempts to get Hickey to abandon his lucrative drag-seine licence
  • Cannery and drag-seine license was sold to Wallace Fisheries in 1912
  • Drag-seine license was cancelled by the government in 1926; BC Packers Ltd. purchased Wallace Fisheries that same year
  • Cannery closed in 1931
Skiffs are lined up along the beach at low tide in front of cannery buildings.

Skeena Commercial Cannery, c. 1910s. Image C-04940 courtesy of the Royal BC Museum and Archives.

Skeena River Commercial Cannery | Anglo-Alliance | British American | Peter Herman

1898-1936

54°09'36.4"N 129°57'56.1"W
  • Established as the Anglo-Alliance Cannery in 1898 at Port Essington on the Skeena River by Peter Herman
  • Purchased by the Skeena River Commercial Co. in 1904 and renamed
  • When the neighbouring British American Cannery burned down in 1923, the Anglo-British Columbia Packing Co. leased the Skeena River Commercial buildings
  • Cannery was renamed the British American Cannery after its purchase by ABC Packing in 1925
  • Operated until 1936 when the machinery was moved to the North Pacific Cannery
Man looking at the burnt remains of the New Westminster waterfront.

New Westminster after the 1898 fire. Image IHP3097 courtesy of the New Westminster Archives.

Sinclair Cannery | Mayflour

1897-1898

49°12'04.8"N 122°54'31.4"W
  • Built in New Westminster by the Sinclair Canning Co. in anticipation of the legendary salmon run of 1897
  • Canned for one season only
  • Burned down in the New Westminster fire of 1898
Shushartie Cannery buildings photographed from a boat on the water. Two ropes, part of the rigging of a boat, are visible in the foreground. The cannery sits at the waters edge with a wooden hill behind it.

View of the Shushartie Cannery from on board a ship. Cannery workers often travelled to the canneries by steamship at the start of the summer season. Gulf of Georgia Cannery Society Archives G2010.027.045

Shushartie Cannery

1914-1928

50°51'44.6"N 127°52'19.1"W
  • Built in 1914 at Shusartie Bay on northeastern Vancouver Island by the Goletas Fish Co.
  • Purchased by Western Packers Ltd., then by the Canadian Fishing Co. in 1923
  • Closed in 1928 and the machinery was moved to the Bones Bay Cannery
Cans are stacked to the rafters inside a wooden building.

Can loft at an unknown cannery. Gulf of Georgia Cannery Society Archives G2002.003.001aa

Seymour Inlet Cannery

1917 - unknown date

51°05'20.7"N 127°20'39.3"W
  • Built in 1917 in Nugent Sound by the Anglo-British Columbia Packing Co.
  • Originally operated as a saltery
  • Canned pinks, cohos, and chum from August to September
Aerial view of Seal Cove Cannery buildings with water in the foreground and wooded hills in the background

Seal Cove Cannery. 1990s Image courtesy of the Canadian Fishing Company.

Seal Cove Cannery | Canadian Fish and Cold Storage Company Limited

1943–1953

54°20'04.3"N 130°17'00.9"W
  • Built in 1912 at Seal Cove in Prince Rupert by Canadian Fish and Cold Storage
  • Re-opened in 1926 as a clam canning plant by Somerville Canning Co.
  • Acquired by Millerd Packing Co. in 1927
  • Two-line salmon cannery operated from 1943 to 1953
  • The Canadian Fishing Co. Ltd. purchased the property from Canadian National Railway in 1991 to build a small fresh fish plant.
Buildings with metal siding and stacks of wooden fish crates

The Seafood Products Cannery at Port Hardy, August 1980. Gulf of Georgia Cannery Society Archives G2011.003.043

Seafood Products Plant

1965 - unknown date

50°42'56.9"N 127°29'16.0"W
  •  Built in 1965 in Port Hardy by Seafood Products Ltd.
  • Had a unique canning line that produced 4-lb cans of salmon and tuna for institutional trade
  • Processing center for canned, frozen and fresh fish
  • Majority of products were shipped to Japan
  • Company purchased by Maple Leaf Foods Inc. in 1995
Grouping of tents on a grassy field with a cannery building in the background.

Indigenous workers’ camp behind the Sea Island Cannery. Image 1993 3 1 courtesy of the City of Richmond Archives.

Sea Island Cannery | Bon Accord

1889 - unknown date

49°10'48.1"N 123°11'23.5"W
  • Established in 1889 on Swishwash Island near Steveston by Alexander Ewen and Daniel Munn
  • Acquired by the BC Packers Association in 1902
  • Originally called the Bon Accord Cannery, but the name was changed to avoid confusion with the other Bon Accord Cannery at Port Mann on the Fraser River
Fishing nets spread out over the docks at Scottish Canadian

Net racks and Columbia River style skiffs docked in front of Scottish Canadian Cannery. Gulf of Georgia Cannery Society Archives G2005.046.017

Scottish Canadian Cannery | Graham

1899-1912

49°07'37.8"N 123°11'46.1"W
  • Built in 1899 on tidal flats near Steveston by the Malcolm & Windsor United Canning Co.
  • Entire cannery complex was built on pilings
  • Closed in 1912
  • Japanese fishermen and their families continued to live in the cannery housing until people of Japanese descent were removed from the B.C. coast during WWII
Collection of buildings along the riverfront viewed from across the river

Royal Engineers Camp, Sapperton, c. 1862. Image IHP0623 courtesy of New Westminster Archives

Sapperton Cannery | Stamp’s

1871-1879
  • Established in 1871 in New Westminster at Sapperton by Captain Edward Stamp
  • Sold to Holbrook & Co. in 1872, then to King & Co. in 1878
  • Destroyed by fire in 1879
Cannery buildings viewed from the water with skiffs in the foreground.

Saanich Canning Company Ltd., Sidney, B.C, Image BC_1532_1338_001 courtesy of UBC Special Collections

Saanich Cannery

1926-1927

48°39'49.1"N 123°23'59.9"W
  • Built by the Saanich Canning Co. at Sidney on southern Vancouver Island in 1905
  • Plant was used to can clams from 1905-1908, then operated as a fruit cannery
  • Salmon was canned at the plant during the 1926 and 1927 seasons
Boat docked at the Royal Fish Company plant. Several men stand by the wooden building holding fish

Halibut Boat Anna J. docked at The Royal Fish Co. 1918. Prince Rupert City & Regional Archives & Museum of Northern BC, Wrathall Collection, WP996-72-11094

Royal Fisheries Plant

1959-1962

54°19'04.2"N 130°19'23.8"W
  • Royal Fisheries installed a canning line at their fresh and frozen fish plant at Prince Rupert in 1959
  • Ocean Fisheries purchased the plant and closed the canning line in 1962
The end of a wooden dock with seagulls perched on the pilings

Seagulls on an unknown cannery dock. Gulf of Georgia Cannery Society Archives G2001.009.019B.

Rood’s Cannery

1882-1884

51°17'29.4"N 127°21'21.9"W
  • Established in 1882 at Quachela Lagoon in Smith Inlet by John Rood
  • Could not compete with Quashela Packing Co.'s yield from their drag-seine license so plant closed after two seasons
  • The machinery was purchased by the Victoria Canning Co. and moved to Wannock Cannery at Rivers Inlet
Can label features a salmon in an upside down horseshoe.

Label from a Todd & Sons Horseshoe Brand “tall” or one pound can of fancy sockeye. The label boasts 56 years of salmon canning. Todd & Sons canned salmon was a household name in its heyday. Gulf of Georgia Cannery Society Archives G991.30.1.00

Richmond Cannery – North Arm

1882-1905

49°12'07.9"N 123°08'36.1"W
  • Built in 1882 on the North Arm of the Fraser River, on Sea Island
  • Purchased brand new by J.H. Todd & Sons
  • Canned salmon under the Horseshoe label
  • Closed in 1905
Red label features images of a chum salmon and a beaver.

Can label for Todd's Beaver Brand chum salmon. Gulf of Georgia Cannery Society Archives.

Richmond Cannery | Beaver

1889-1924

49°07'03.5"N 123°09'37.7"W
  • Built in 1889 in Steveston by J.H. Todd & Sons as Beaver Cannery
  • Renamed in 1905 after the closing of Todds' original Richmond Cannery
  • Buildings were destroyed by fire in 1924
  • Site was used as a fish camp and machine shop to service the Todd & Sons fleet until 1984
The main cannery building is supported by floats and pilings. The words "Canadian Co. Photo #577.P." are inscribed on the photo.

Redonda Cannery, Redonda Island. 1930s. Gulf of Georgia Cannery Society Archives 1997.067.005

Redonda Cannery

1935-1942 and 1946-1948

50°15'38.8"N 124°57'41.8"W
  • Built in 1935 on West Redonda Island at Redonda Bay by Francis Millerd & Co.
  • Operated intermittently and closed permanently in 1948
  • The entire settlement at Redonda Bay was abandoned in 1972
Vessel named "Kingcome" moored at a dock in front of cannery buildings

A boat moored at the Queen Charlotte Cannery, 1953. Gulf of Georgia Cannery Society Archives 2000.001.003.007

Queen Charlotte Cannery | New Masset

1960-1966

54°00'26.5"N 132°08'44.2"W
  • Built in 1950 when Sam Simpson moved his operation from the Old Masset Cannery site in the Haida Gwaii archipelago
  • Operated as a salmon cannery from 1960-1966
  • Purchased in 1966 by Nelson Brothers Fisheries and used for crab and clam processing
  • Destroyed by fire in 1971
Aerial view of long houses with canoes and drying racks in the foreground

Quatsino First Nation village c. 1866. Image A-06122 courtesy of the Royal BC Museum and Archives.

Quatsino Cannery | Wallace

1911-1928

50°27'38.2"N 127°54'13.6"W
  • Built in 1911 on northern Vancouver Island by Wallace Fisheries
  • Changed hands twice before being purchased and closed by BC Packers Ltd. in 1928
  • The reduction plant operated until 1930 and the buildings were demolished in 1934
Salmon can label for the Quashela Packing Co. Text on the label reads: "Fresh Quashela River salmon Smith's Inlet, B.C. Packed by Quashela Packing Co. Agents Welch, Rithet and Co. Victoria B.C."

Can label for Quashela Packing Co. c. 1900, Image I-51549 courtesy of the Royal BC Museum and Archives.

Quashela Cannery | Smith Inlet

1883-1885

51°17'10.4"N 127°21'01.0"W
  • Built in 1883 at Quascilla Creek in Smith Inlet by the Quashela Packing Co.
  • The company had an exclusive drag-seine license for the area
  • Closed after two seasons and the machinery was moved to the Wannock Cannery on Rivers Inlet
  • The company and property acquired by BC Packers Association in 1902, but license awarded to W.M. Hickey and the plant was not reopened
  • BC Packers continued to own the property for several decades; tried for years to obtain the drag-seine licence from Hickey but were never successful
Puntledge River with treed banks. Typed caption reads "Puntledge Falls, near Courtenay, B.C."

Puntledge Falls in the 1900s, near where the cannery would have stood. Image H-00562 courtesy of the Royal BC Museum and Archives

Puntledge Cannery

1918

49°41'10.2"N 124°59'22.0"W
  • In 1918 a salmon canning line was installed in an evaporated milk plant in Courtenay BC
  • Salmon was canned at this site for only one season to the meet the demand by Britain for canned salmon during WWI
  • Canned salmon provided a protein-rich, easily transportable food to allied soldiers and civilians. The British demand for canned salmon fell after the war ended
White cannery buildings with a treed hill behind them

The Provincial Cannery on Rivers Inlet. Image Out P1160.3 courtesy of City of Vancouver Archives

Provincial Cannery – Rivers Inlet

1917-1941

51°34'05.4"N 127°35'09.7"W
  • Built in 1917 at Schooner Pass at Rivers Inlet by William Todd and Robert Jonson
  • Owned by Provincial Canning Co. Ltd., a subsidiary of J.H. Todd & Sons
  • Converted to a fish camp in 1941 to support the Klemtu Cannery
Hundreds of chum salmon lying on the floor of a cannery.

Salmon on receiving floor of an unknown cannery. Gulf of Georgia Cannery Society Archives 1998.006.002/8

Provincial Cannery – Fraser River

1896-1902

49°11'02.3"N 123°08'22.6"W
  • Built in 1896 by the Provincial Packing Co.
  • Located south of the bridge from Sea Island to Lulu Island, near the MacKinnon fruit cannery
  • Acquired and closed by the BC Packers Association in 1902
  • Property was sold and the buildings were torn down in 1905
Cannery buildings nestled at the end of a bay with a treed mountain behind.

Princess Royal Cannery buildings from the water on China Hat island ca 1916. Image B-09646 courtesy of the Royal BC Museum and Archives.

Princess Royal Cannery | China Hat

1900-1903

52°35'29.7"N 128°31'23.0"W
  • Established in 1900 at Swindle Island by Toms, Morris, and Fraser
  • Purchased in 1902 by the BC Packers Association and demolished in 1903
  • Klemtu Cannery was built on the same site in 1927
Exterior view of fish shed on pilings.

Prince Rupert Fishermen’s Co-operative Association main fish shed, 1946. Image BC_1532_1337_083 courtesy of UBC Special Collections.

Prince Rupert Fishermen’s Co-Operative Plant

1961-1989

54°17'24.5"N 130°21'30.6"W
  • Prince Rupert Fishermen’s Cooperative (PRFC) built a plant at next to the government wharf in Prince Rupert in 1931
  • Started by processing halibut livers for oil
  • 1943-1955, added a fish dock, fish shed, smoke house, reduction plant and cold storage
  • The cannery operated from 1961-1989
  • Acquired by J.S. McMillan Fisheries when the PRFC declared bankruptcy in 1989
Cannery buildings, docks, and boats with water in the foreground.

Oceanside Cannery in Prince Rupert, 1953, shortly after it was re-opened by Canfisco. Image I-28893 courtesy of the Royal BC Museum and Archives.

Prince Rupert Fisheries Plant | Old Oceanside

1940-1942 and 1950-1971

54°18'26.1"N 130°20'34.7"W
  • Built in 1940 on the Prince Rupert waterfront by Nelson Brothers Fisheries
  • Closed from 1942-1950 when the site was used by American military forces
  • Reopened in 1951 as Oceanside Cannery by the Canadian Fishing Co.
  • Closed in 1971 after a dock fire destroyed the facility
  • New Oceanside Cannery was built on the same site in 1972
The end of a wooden dock with seagulls perched on the pilings

Seagulls on an unknown cannery dock. Gulf of Georgia Cannery Society Archives G2001.009.019B.

Price’s Cannery

1890-1893

53°29'16.9"N 128°38'39.8"W
  • Built in 1890 at the Gardner Inlet near Kitimat by Price's Salmon Canning and Preserving Co.
  • Bought by John Carthew in 1893 and closed
  • Equipment was moved to Carlisle Cannery
Fisherman is hoisting a salmon with a peugh. Standing on the side of a small gillnetter

Fishing salmon on the Fraser River, 1952. Image I-27850 courtesy of the Royal BC Museum and Archives.

Premier Cannery

1899-1901

49°12'19.4"N 122°54'08.4"W
  • Established in 1899 at New Westminster by Byrn & Walker of the Premier Canning Co.
  • Operated only three seasons
  • Closed permanently in 1904
Black and white drawing of the main cannery building and dock.

Charcoal sketch of the Portland Cannery by Gladys Blyth. Courtesy of the North Pacific Cannery, P984.141.1

Portland Cannery

1917-1918

55°03'20.0"N 130°08'41.0"W
  • Established in 1917 at Pearse Canal near the BC-Alaska border by Merril DesBrisay
  • Operated for only one year
  • Property reverted to the Crown in 1939
Two women stand together on a rocky point with the cannery buildings directly behind them across the water.

Two women pose in front of the Port Renfrew Cannery, 1925. Image D-04580 courtesy of the Royal BC Museum and Archives

Port Renfrew Cannery

1918-1920

48°33'22.9"N 124°25'06.1"W
  • Built in 1918 at Port Renfrew by the Defiance Packing Co.
  • In 1920 the cannery was dismantled and moved to the Skeena River
Cans are stacked to the rafters inside a wooden building.

Can loft at an unknown cannery. Gulf of Georgia Cannery Society Archives G2002.003.001aa

Port Nelson Cannery

1905-1942

54°58'24.5"N 129°59'09.4"W
  • Built in 1905 at Low Point on the Nass River by Port Nelson Canning and Salting Co.
  • Sold to the Anglo-BC Packing Co. in 1911
  • Closed in 1942
  • Property sold to a lawyer from Los Angeles in 1978
Aerial view of cannery buildings and dockyard.

Port Edward Cannery. Image 2001 34 3 359 courtesy of the City of Richmond Archives.

Port Edward Cannery

1918-1931 and 1943-1981

54°13'17.2"N 130°17'40.5"W
  • Built in 1913 south of Prince Rupert by Port Edward Fisheries but not operated until 1918 due to WWI
  • Canning was shut down in 1931
  • Nelson Brothers Fisheries reinstalled canning equipment in 1943 and operated the site until 1981 when it had 7 canning lines
The main cannery building viewed from across the bay

The Port Albion Cannery, 1937. Gulf of Georgia Cannery Society Archives G2002.010.002.028

Port Albion Cannery

1927-1948

48°56'50.9"N 125°33'04.9"W
  • Built in 1927 near Ucluelet on Vancouver Island by the Banfield Packing Co.
  • Owned by the Nootka-Banfield Packing Co. and the Canadian Fishing Co. before it was purchased by BC Packers Ltd. in 1937
  • Processed herring, pilchards, and salmon
  • Herring reduction plant continued to operate for another decade after canning ended in 1948
  • Port Albion was the last herring reduction plant on Vancouver Island
Curved roof buildings at Porcher Island Cannery.

View of boats at the Humpback Bay Cannery dock at Porcher Island BC, 1929, Image BC_1532_1325_001 courtesy of UBC Special Collections

Porcher Island Cannery | Humpback Bay

1928-1932

54°01'08.3"N 130°17'14.5"W
  • Established in 1928 at Porcher Island by Lewis Hogan for the Chatham Sound Packing Co.
  • Unique curved roof allowed more space on the top floor of the plant
  • Purchased by the Canadian Fishing Co. in 1932 and used as a gillnet station for the northern area until 1968
Cannery buildings in disrepair with planks of wood in the water, and broken windows.

The remains of a Phoenix Cannery building on the Steveston waterfront. Gulf of Georgia Cannery Society Archives G2006.002b

Phoenix Cannery | English’s

1882-1895 and 1897-1969

49°07'19.0"N 123°10'27.6"W
  • Established in 1882 by Marshall English on the Steveston waterfront
  • Purchased by the Anglo-British Columbia (ABC) Packing Co. in 1891
  • Destroyed by fire in 1895
  • ABC Packing rebuilt the cannery just west of its original site in 1897
  • Canning occurred at the site for 72 years, ending in 1969
  • The buildings were used for herring reduction and net storage into the 1970s
Paramount cannery buildings as seen across the company parking lot. The words "Paramount Cannery, Nelson Bros. Fisheries Ltd." are painted on the side of the building.

Two buildings in the Paramount Cannery complex, 1977. Gulf of Georgia Cannery Society Archives G2004.008.008.019

Paramount Cannery

1957-1968

49°07'09.1"N 123°09'53.4"W
  • Built in 1957 on the Steveston waterfront by Nelson Brothers Fisheries
  • First new cannery in Steveston in 50 years
  • It was the only Steveston cannery built on landfill not pilings
  • Plant was purchased and closed by BC Packers Ltd. in 1968 and converted to a net shed
  • Cannery buildings are now used by the Steveston Harbour Authority and the Fisherman’s Boot Café
Cannery complex viewed from the water with a treed hill and low clouds in the background

The Pacofi Cannery complex in 1940, three years before it was destroyed by fire. Image NA-07669 courtesy of the Royal BC Museum and Archives

Pacofi Cannery

1938-1943

52°50'43.4"N 131°51'58.1"W
  • Built on Moresby Island in the Haida Gwaii archipelago in 1910 as a reduction plant, cold storage and ice plant
  • Built by Constantin Alvo von Alvensleben & Associates of Germany, operating as Pacific Coast Fisheries
  • A canning line was added in 1938 after the plant was purchased by BC Packers Ltd.
  • Plans to use original buildings as a submarine base were revealed during construction in 1938
  • Plant was destroyed by fire in 1943
Black and white drawing of the main cannery building and dock.

Charcoal sketch of the Pacific Northern Cannery by Gladys Blyth. Courtesy of the North Pacific Cannery, P984.142.1

Pacific Northern Cannery

1902-1906

55°04'30.8"N 130°00'53.8"W
  • Built in 1902 at Observatory Inlet by the BC Canning Co.
  • Canned Pink and Coho salmon mainly
  • The plant was sold to Wallace Fisheries in 1904 and closed in 1906
  • Canning equipment was moved to the new Arrandale Cannery
Pacific Coast fish camp buildings with a boat docked at the wharf in front.

Pacific Coast Cannery, 1977. Gulf of Georgia Cannery Society Archives G2004.008.008.012

Pacific Coast Cannery

1893-1918

49°07'11.9"N 123°10'02.8"W
  • Built in 1893 at the Steveston waterfront by the Pacific Coast Packing Co.
  • Acquired by BC Packers Association in 1902
  • Operated only every four years during dominant sockeye runs
  • Operated as a herring saltery 1918-1930
Grouping of homes, fences, trails and gardens on a point of land with water in the background.

The village of Pender Harbour in the 1890s, ten years before the PH Alder cannery was built there. Image C-08551 courtesy of the Royal BC Museum and Archives

P.H. Alder Cannery

1906-1908

49°36'48.6"N 124°02'20.7"W
  • Established in 1906 at Bargain Bay in Pender Harbour by P.H. Alder
  • Operated for two seasons before closing
Fisherman is hoisting a salmon with a peugh. Standing on the side of a small gillnetter

Fishing salmon on the Fraser River, 1952. Image I-27850 courtesy of the Royal BC Museum and Archives.

Ontario Cannery

1897-1898
  • Established in 1897 in New Westminster by the Brannan Brothers
  • Operated for two seasons
  • Burned down in the New Westminster fire of 1898 and was not rebuilt
Groupe d'hommes sur un quai; sept assis et quatre debout.

Employés de la conserverie Oceanic assis sur un quai. La conseverie Oceanic était située sur l’île Smith. Image IHP2644-259, gracieuseté des Archives de New Westminster

Oceanic Cannery

1903-1934

54°09'04.9"N 130°17'02.8"W
  • Built in 1903 on the south side of Smith Island in the Skeena River region by the BC Canning Co.
  • Replaced the Aberdeen Cannery that had burned down the previous year
  • Had two canning lines by 1923
  • Destroyed by fire in 1934
  • Property sold to the Canadian Fishing Co. in 1935 and operated as a fish camp until 1950
Two men wearing signs labelled "on strike" standing in front of buildings and parked cars

Trawler fishermen Bill Currie (left) and Monty McIntyre picketing at Oakland Industries, Victoria. Image BC_1532_033_006 courtesy of UBC Special Collections

Oakland Cannery

1960-1977

48°25'26.0"N 123°22'45.4"W
  • Built in 1960 in Victoria at Ogden Point by Oakland Industries
  • On the site of the former J.H. Todd & Sons headquarters
  • Operated a cold storage, as well as herring and salmon processing
  • Closed and sold in 1977 due to financial difficulties
A section of the docks at Nootka with moored fishing boats. Two skiffs and a gillnetter are tied to the dock.

The dock and side entrance of the Nootka Cannery, circa 1920. Gulf of Georgia Cannery Society Archives G2001.009.173B

Nootka Cannery

1917-1945

49°35'34.4"N 126°37'00.6"W
  • Built in 1896 north of Yuquot as a saltery
  • Site was purchased by the Nootka Packing Co. and a canning line was added in 1917
  • Pilchards, herring and salmon were canned until the plant closed in 1929
  • Cannery site is now part of the Santa Gertrudis - Boca del Infierno Marine Provincial Park
A man is squatting on the wharf with cannery buildings in the background.

To announce the beginning of fishing, a cannon or horn would sound to alert the fishermen. This man is setting off the signal at Nass Harbour cannery in the 1910s. Image C-04933 courtesy of the Royal BC Museum and Archives

Nass Harbour Cannery | McLellan’s

1887-1927

54°55'26.7"N 129°57'13.8"W
  • Established in 1887 on the Nass River by J.A. McLellan
  • Construction materials came from the recently demolished Croasdaile Cannery
  • Closed in 1927
  • Property reverted to the Crown in 1940
View of buildings in Nanaimo Harbour from a hilltop

City of Nanaimo in 1913 as seen from a hilltop, facing toward the Bastion and Departure Bay. Image E-02633 courtesy of the Royal BC Museum and Archives

Nanaimo Cannery

1914-1930

49°09'04.2"N 123°55'14.9"W
  • Built in 1914 in Nanaimo by the Nanaimo Canning Co.
  • Salmon cannery with herring processing for halibut bait and dry salting
  • In 1925 the first vacuum sealer machine used in B.C. was installed here
  • Purchased by Canadian Fishing Co. in 1926
  • Last recorded salmon pack was in 1930
Cannery buildings in the distance at low tide.

Cannery at Naden Harbour. Prince Rupert City & Regional Archives, J.D. Allen photo, P991-69-6093

Naden Harbour Cannery | Wallace Fisheries

1911-1919

53°59'56.4"N 132°34'55.7"W
  • Built in 1911 at Naden Harbour by Wallace Fisheries
  • Granted a canning license on the condition that only fishers of European descent be employed, to bring European setters to the region
  • Plant dismantled and moved to Watun River in 1919 to be closer to the pink salmon fishing grounds
  • Eugene Simpson and Hume Babington built a crab cannery on this site in 1919
The end of a wooden dock with seagulls perched on the pilings

Seagulls on an unknown cannery dock. Gulf of Georgia Cannery Society Archives G2001.009.019B.

Moses Inlet Cannery

1932-1935

51°41'43.7"N 127°26'15.6"W
  • Established in 1932 at Rivers Inlet by Frank Inrig
  • Lumber for the cannery was provided by a group of Japanese locals who moved their saw mill on site
  • Closed in 1935 due to the Great Depression
Interior of a modern, mechanized canning line with several workers at different stations.

The canning line at the Millbanke Cannery in Bella Bella, circa 1975. Gulf of Georgia Cannery Society Archives G2011.003.078

Millbanke Cannery | Bella Bella no.2 | Central Native Fisherman’s Co-op

1966-1981

52°09'15.5"N 128°05'45.4"W
  • Built in 1966 at Shearwater on Denny Island by Millbanke Fisheries Ltd.
  • Purchased by Central Native Fishermen's Co-op in 1975
  • Plant was upgraded in 1981 and closed shortly after
Workers moving nets between the wharf and skiffs in the water below.

MacTavish Cannery and wharf. 1920. Image H-06508 courtesy of the Royal BC Museum and Archives

McTavish Cannery

1918-1923

51°40'01.5"N 127°17'35.7"W
  • Built in 1918 at Rivers Inlet by McTavish Fisheries
  • Sold to Gosse-Millerd in 1920 and closed in 1923
  • Site sold to Anglo-British Columbia Packing Co. in 1923
Exterior view of the building with several cars parked around it.

East end of J.S. McMillan Plant, Prince Rupert, B.C. 1970s. Image 2001-34-3-681 courtesy of the City of Richmond Archives.

McMillan Fisheries Plant | Babcock | Bingham Fisheries

1957-1993

54°19'07.0"N 130°19'24.0"W
  • William Babcock bought a small fresh fish operation in Prince Rupert in 1950
  • In 1957 a canning line, can re-form machines, and cold storage were added
  • Ownership changed twice more before being sold to J.S. McMillan Fisheries in 1977
  • Canning line for quarter pound cans was added in 1981
  • McMillan closed the facility after acquiring Prince Rupert Fishermen's Co-op plant in 1993
Two wooden shacks on the waterfront.

The cannery at Matilda Creek, 1930. Image B-01078 courtesy of the Royal BC Museum and Archives

Matilda Creek Cannery

1926-1930

49°16'49.8"N 126°04'12.0"W
  • Established in 1926 at Sidney Inlet on Vancouver Island in a partnership between the Gosse Corporation and the Gibson Brothers
  • Acquired by BC Packers Ltd. in 1928
  • Closed in 1930
  • Dismantled in 1935; Gibson Brothers kept the property
Buildings line the beach facing the water.

The village of Masset on Haida Gwaii, three years before the cannery was built there. Image G-06004 courtesy of the Royal BC Museum and Archives

Masset Cannery | Old Masset

1927-1950

54°02'43.0"N 132°11'49.6"W
  • Built in 1927 on Graham Island in the Haidi Gwaii archipelago by Masset Canners Ltd.
  • Operated until it was sold to Nelson Brothers Fisheries in 1938
  • Nelson Brothers Fisheries leased the property to the Queen Charlotte Canners from 1940 – 1950
Photo of workers on a dock repairing nets hanging on net racks.

Margaret Bay net racks and dock. Image CVA374-211 courtesy of City of Vancouver Archives

Margaret Bay Cannery

1916-1945

51°20'01.0"N 127°29'39.4"W
  • Established in 1916 at Smith Inlet by Robert Chambers of Western Packers Ltd.
  • Canned mostly sockeye salmon
  • Purchased by the Canadian Fishing Co. in 1923
  • Canning ended in 1945 and site operated as a gillnet camp until 1959
Scale drawing of Manitou Cannery.

Fire plan for the Manitou Cannery complex with buildings and water sources, 1923. Gulf of Georgia Cannery Society Archives G2009.016 Plan 26

Manitou Cannery

1907-1925

52°51'15.1"N 127°03'13.0"W
  • Built in 1907 by Dawson & Buttimer on the Dean Channel opposite Kimsquit
  • Poor revenues were blamed on the depletion of the sockeye salmon runs
  • Purchased by the Canadian Fishing Co. in 1925 and dismantled shortly after
  • Lumber from the buildings and wharves were used to build Tallheo Cannery
Steamship docked at cannery buildings with land in the background covered in trees.

The S.S. Muriel steamship docked in front of the Lowe Inlet cannery. Image E-03686 courtesy of the Royal BC Museum and Archives

Lowe Inlet Cannery

1890-1930

53°32'54.5"N 129°35'39.8"W
  • Built in 1890 on the Grenville Channel by Lowe Inlet Packing Co.
  • Absorbed by the BC Packers Association in 1902
  • Changed hands once more before being re-purchased by BC Packers Ltd. in 1928
  • Closed after the 1930 season, used as a camp for Claxton Cannery
  • Site is now located within a Provincial Coastal Marine Park
Salmon can label "Empress Brand, Fresh Fraser River Salmon, Lulu Island Canning Co., Vancouver BC"

This brightly coloured label features an illustration of Queen Victoria to fit with the "Empress" brand name. 1900s. Image I-51546 courtesy of the Royal BC Museum and Archives.

London Cannery | Lulu Island

1891-1902

49°11'59.4"N 122°55'36.8"W
  • Built in 1891 by the Lulu Island Canning Co. at Steveston
  • Purchased by the London Canning Co. in 1895 and renamed London Cannery
  • Purchased by BC Packers Association in 1902 and converted to a warehouse
  • Sold to the government in 1936 and used to moor dredges and hydrographic survey vessels
Lockeport cannery buildings with workers on the dock in front. "Lockeport" is painted on the side of one of the buildings.

Workers unloading supplies from a steamship at the Lockeport Cannery. Photo was taken from on board the ship by Alec Reid, engineer at the Alliford Bay Cannery. Gulf of Georgia Cannery Society Archives 1997.009.004

Lockeport Cannery

1918-1919 and 1927-1940s

52°43'43.3"N 131°48'46.6"W
  • Built in 1918 in Klunkwoi Bay of Moresby Island  in the Haida Gwaii archipelago by the Lockeport Canning Co.
  • Operated for one season before going into liquidation
  • Closed in 1919 due to the market downturn after the end of WWI when the European demand for canned salmon fell
  • Leased by the Canadian Fishing Co. starting in 1923 and purchased by the Canadian Fishing Co. in 1927
  • Closed in the 1940s
Steveston waterfront showing many buildings lined up along the Fraser River, with boats in the water.

Federation Cannery, with the Imperial Cannery in the distance on the Steveston Waterfront. Image 2183 courtesy of the Vancouver Public Library.

Lighthouse Cannery | Steveston | Federation

1893 -1918

49°07'25.6"N 123°10'58.5"W
  • Built in 1893 on the Steveston waterfront by the Steveston Canning Co.
  • Purchased in 1898 by the Federation Canning & Packing Co. and renamed Lighthouse
  • Leased by different companies for 3 seasons between 1906-1910
  • Cannery buildings were destroyed in the Steveston Fire of 1918
The end of a wooden dock with seagulls perched on the pilings

Seagulls on an unknown cannery dock. Gulf of Georgia Cannery Society Archives G2001.009.019B.

Leroy Bay Cannery

1929-1937

51°16'20.0"N 127°39'50.3"W
  • Built in 1929 at Leroy Bay in Smith Inlet by Kingcome Packers Ltd.
  • Buildings burned down in an unusual fire in 1937 possibly insurance fraud
  • Site used as a seasonal camp for Nelson Brothers Fisheries
  • Possibly also known as Browning Channel Cannery
Hundreds of chum salmon lying on the floor of a cannery.

Salmon on receiving floor of an unknown cannery. Gulf of Georgia Cannery Society Archives 1998.006.002/8

Lasqueti Cannery | Gulf Island | False Bay

1915-1919

49°29'26.8"N 124°21'20.0"W
  • Built in 1915 by the Gulf Island Fishing & Canning Co. at False Bay on Lasqueti Island
  • Closed in 1919 when the company went bankrupt at the end of WWI.
Scale drawing of Langara Cannery buildings at Naden Harbour

Fire plan for Langara Cannery complex from 1923, with buildings and water sources identified. Gulf of Georgia Cannery Society Archives G2009.016 Plan 34.

Langara Cannery

1924-1938

54°12'57.1"N 133°00'25.2"W
  • Two-line salmon cannery built at Masset in Haida Gwaii in 1924 by the Langara Packing & Fishing Co.
  • The company was better known for canning crab and clams
  • Bought by Nootka Packing after the death of one of the company partners
  • Closed in 1938
Cans are stacked to the rafters inside a wooden building.

Can loft at an unknown cannery. Gulf of Georgia Cannery Society Archives G2002.003.001aa

Laidlaw’s Cannery

1881-1902
  • Built in 1881 at the site of the former Sapperton Cannery in New Westminster by Laidlaw & Co.
  • Large cannery complex employed 250 workers
  • Laidlaw's properties were acquired in 1885 by the Victoria Canning Co.
  • Purchased and closed in 1902 by BC Packers Association
Lagoon Bay Cannery dock with mountains in the background.

A fleet of fishing boats as well as a large packer boat moored at the dock at Lagoon Bay Cannery. Gulf of Georgia Cannery Society Archives G2006.003.001

Lagoon Bay Cannery | Cumshewa

1918-1941

52°52'39.1"N 131°59'56.0"W
  • Built in 1918 by Western Salmon Packers Ltd. at Selwell Inlet in Haida Gwaii
  • Purchased in 1923 by the Canadian Fishing Co.
  • Closed during industry low years between 1931-1933
  • According to Stan Milne, a manager at the plant, "the dog salmon used to come into the Lagoon Bay cannery so fresh that...they'd bounce out of the can"
  • Closed permanently after the 1941 season, production moved to either Butedale or Carlisle
Village Island in the distance across an expanse of water.

Village Island was home to the Ladysmith Cannery for only seven years. 1914. Image H-07183 courtesy of the Royal BC Museum and Archives

Ladysmith Cannery | Village Island | Turnbull’s

1900-1907

54°09'36.9"N 129°57'24.4"W
  • Established in 1900 on Village Island by John Turnbull
  • Operated by Phillip Jacobsen until 1904 and then by Peter and Kate Herman
  • Name changed to Village Island to avoid confusion with Ladysmith on Vancouver Island
  • Cannery closed in 1907 after Peter Herman drowned in the Skeena River
 
Treed hills across the water.

The Kumeon Cannery operated in Steamer Passage for only four seasons, c. 1949. Image NA-12102 courtesy of the Royal BC Museum and Archives

Kumeon Cannery

1917-1921

54°41'49.4"N 130°19'33.5"W
  • Built in 1917 in Steamer Passage on the Nass River by Northern Fisheries
  • Closed in 1921 when it failed to sell its stock of canned salmon
  • Property was purchased by the Canadian Fishing Co. in 1926 but the cannery was not re-opened
Men resting on the wharf and working near the fish bins at the Koprino Harbour Cannery. Signs on the buildings read "The Canadian Fishing Co. Ltd." and "Koprino Harbor"

A row of filled fish bins sit on a dock below the main wharf at the Canadian Fishing Co.’s Koprino Cannery, 1928. Courtesy of the Canadian Fishing Company.

Koprino Cannery

1927-1930

50°29'53.2"N 127°52'25.8"W
  • Built in 1927 at Quatsino Sound on northern Vancouver Island by the Canadian Fishing Co.
  • Also housed a reduction plant for pilchards and herrings
  • Final canned salmon pack was in 1930
Klemtu Cannery buildings on the distant shore with fishing boats in the foreground.

The Klemtu cannery was built on the same site as the Princess Royal Cannery. ca 1936. Image E-07904 courtesy of the Royal BC Museum and Archives

Klemtu Cannery

1927-1930 and 1934-1969

52°35'30.1"N 128°31'19.6"W
  • Built in 1927 on the Klemtu Reserve on Swindle Island by the Klemtu Canning Co.
  • Was a year-round operation that processed halibut, salmon, herring, clams and abalone
  • Closed in 1930 and reopened in 1934 by J.H. Todd and Sons
  • Shut down in 1969 due, in part, to a batch of under-cooked cans
  • Ownership of the land was transferred to the Klemtu band
Cannery buildings and wharf on pilings with mountains in the background.

The Kimsquit Cannery at low tide in 1915 looks small in front of the tall mountains at Cape Caution. Image C-04947 courtesy of the Royal BC Museum and Archives

Kimsquit Cannery

1901-1935

52°50'18.4"N 126°58'13.3"W
  • Built in 1901 in Dean Channel off Cape Caution by the Namu Canning Co.
  • Purchased in 1912 by Henry Doyle who installed hydroelectricity
  • Changed ownership twice more before being acquired and closed by BC Packers Ltd. in 1928
  • Closed down in 1935 and dismantled in 1938
Kildonan Cannery buildings viewed from above showing the buildings and wharves extending over the water

A view of Kildonan Cannery from above, as it was in 1928. The cannery building, boardwalks, and wharf are visible. Many of these structures were destroyed in an earthquake in 1946. Image courtesy of the Fisherman Publishing Society Collection, University of British Columbia.

Kildonan Cannery | Uchucklesit

1903-1946

49°00'13.1"N 125°00'06.3"W
  • Built in 1903 on western Vancouver Island by the Alberni Packing Co. Ltd.
  • Sold to the Wallace Fisheries Ltd. in 1906
  • Housed a saltery, fish reduction plant, and can-making facilities
  • Albacore tuna was canned at the site after 1939
  • Closed in 1946 and the property was sold in 1965
Long wharf with many fishing boats moored to it.

Wharf at Kildala, Rivers Inlet, B.C, 1955, Image BC_1532_1379_023 courtesy of UBC Special Collections.

Kildala Cannery

1906-c.1940s

51°41'37.4"N 127°21'31.8"W
  • Built in 1906 at Kilbella Bay on Rivers Inlet by Dawson and Buttimer
  • Some confusion in Indigenous place names may have led to the naming of the cannery for the nearby Kildala Arm
  • Sold in 1925 to the Canadian Fishing Co.
  • Operated until the 1940s, when it was converted to a gillnet camp
Rocky outcrops and treed land of Jervis Inlet.

The cannery was built somewhere in the area of Jervis Inlet, seen here in 1947. Image NA-08952 courtesy of the Royal BC Museum and Archives

Jervis Inlet Cannery

1912-1914

49°54'03.0"N 123°54'06.3"W
  • Built in 1912 on Jervis Inlet by the Jervis Inlet Canning Co.
  • Operated only two seasons before the cannery burned down
  • The exact location of the cannery is no longer known
Can label for "Fresh Skeena River salmon packed at Inverness Cannery, Skeena River, British Columbia."

The icicles on the letters on this 1900s can label use Canadian stereotypes to tell consumers that the salmon is from the north. Image I-61289 courtesy of the Royal BC Museum and Archives

Inverness Cannery

1876-1950

54°11'45.7"N 130°14'50.6"W
  • Built in 1876 on the Inverness Passage of the Skeena River by the Northwestern Commercial Co.
  • Was the first cannery built north of the Fraser River
  • Cannery buildings were damaged four times by fire and twice by landslides
  • Cannery closed in 1950 after 74 years of operation
  • Buildings were completely destroyed by fire in 1973
Cans are stacked to the rafters inside a wooden building.

Can loft at an unknown cannery. Gulf of Georgia Cannery Society Archives G2002.003.001aa

Hume Cannery | Ewen (Dummy Cannery)

1896-1902

49°07'19.7"N 123°10'31.6"W
  • Built in 1896 by Alexander Ewen & Co. on the Steveston waterfront as a dummy (non-operational) cannery to qualify for more fishing licenses
  • Purchased and made operational by John A. Hume in 1896
  • Acquired and closed by the BC Packers Association in 1902 and used as a net loft
  • Buildings torn down in 1904 and property used by the Imperial Cannery
Holly Brand salmon label from the Victoria Canning Co. Text reads "British Columbia salmon Fraser River. Victoria Canning Co. of British Columbia. R.P. Rithet and Co. Ltd. Agents Victoria B.C."

The red background of this label is meant to remind customers of the red colour of the salmon meat inside, c. 1900. Image I-51970 courtesy of the Royal BC Museum and Archives

Holly Cannery

1891-1895
  • Built in 1891 by the Victoria Canning Co. Ltd. on the Fraser River Delta
  • Repeatedly damaged by erosion caused by high tides
  • In 1895 the damage was so extensive that the cannery was closed
  • Equipment and lumber was moved to Delta Cannery
Aerial view of cannery buildings

The Hidden Inlet cannery complex, nestled in Pearse Canal in the Coast Mountains of Alaska. University of Washington Libraries, Special Collections, AWC0582.

Hidden Inlet Cannery

c.1900-1940s 54°56'37.2"N 130°20'05.9"W
  • Built on the west shore of the Pearse Canal by Merrill DesBrisay and Co. circa 1900
  • Site was in Alaskan territory after the B.C./Alaska boundary was settled in 1903
  • Merrill DesBrisay and Co. continued to operate the cannery for several years after the settling of the border, but consequently purchased Wales Island Cannery from its American owners in 1910 and rebuilt it
  • Hidden Inlet Cannery sold to an American cannery owner, Eigil Buschmann, in 1921 and canning operations continued until the 1940s
Fishing boats moored at a dock.

Haida Gwaii, 1945. Image I-22208 courtesy of the Royal BC Museum and Archives.

Henslung Bay Cannery

1919

54°11'31.0"N 133°00'03.0"W
  • Established in 1919 by Eugene Simpson and Hume Babington at Henslung Bay on Langara Island in the Haida Gwaii archipelago
  • One-line cannery built using parts from the Lockeport Cannery
  • Cannery closed after one season due to poor location
  • Plant moved by scow to Naden Harbour, where the partners opened a crab cannery
Aerial view of Hecate Cannery with main cannery building on pilings and a packer boat docked along side.

Packer unloading fish at the Hecate Cannery, 1940. Image E-07907 courtesy of the Royal BC Museum and Archives.

Hecate Cannery

1926-1928

49°51'06.6"N 126°44'44.3"W
  • Canning operations were added to an existing reduction plant on Nootka Island in 1926 by the Gosse Packing Co.
  • Canning operation ended with sale to BC Packers Ltd. in 1928
  • The reduction plant was closed in 1930, re-opened in 1935, and closed permanently by the late 1940s
Buildings, boats and wharves at the Haysport Cannery.

Haysport Cannery, 1920s. Image C-06107 courtesy of the Royal BC Museum and Archives

Haysport Cannery

1919-1937

54°10'16.6"N 130°02'30.2"W
  • This Skeena River cannery was converted in 1919 from an existing cold storage facility by Maritime Fisheries Ltd.
  • Purchased by the New England Fishing Co. in 1929
  • Fishing boundaries were moved further downstream in the 1930s, leaving the cannery too far upriver from the fishing grounds
  • Cannery buildings and machinery were moved to Carlisle Cannery in 1938
  • All cannery property was transferred to the Canadian Fishing Co. in 1980
Group portrait with 5 men seated and 5 men standing behind. Four additional people are peaking out the windows of the building behind the men.

Group portrait of prominent owners of fish canneries in the Delta area in the 1800s. Front row: D. Munn, E.A. Wadhams, Alex Ewen, W.W. English, Ben Young. Standing (back row): Mike Leary, H. Harlock, T.E. Ladner, J.H. Laidlaw, R. Matheson. At window (left): E.A. Rousseau and E. Ferriere. 1887. Image 1982-014-001 Courtesy of the Delta Museum and Archives.

Harlock Cannery

1887-1901

49°05'08.0"N 123°06'32.9"W
  • Built in 1887 on the south bank of the Fraser River, west of Ladner by the Harlock Family
  • Purchased by the Victoria Canning Co. Ltd. in 1893
  • Cannery closed after the 1901 season and was acquired by the BC Packers Association in 1902
  • The Delta Cannery was later built on part of the property
Fisherman is hoisting a salmon with a peugh. Standing on the side of a small gillnetter

Fishing salmon on the Fraser River, 1952. Image I-27850 courtesy of the Royal BC Museum and Archives.

Harlock Island Cannery

1905

49°06'40.2"N 123°10'59.8"W
  • Built in 1905 by Dawson and Buttimer after selling their first three canneries to BC Packers Ltd. in 1902 (Brunswick Cannery #1, #2, and #3)
  • Did not employ their own fishermen but bought fish from fishermen working at the mouth of the Fraser River
  • Only operated one season
Hundreds of chum salmon lying on the floor of a cannery.

Salmon on receiving floor of an unknown cannery. Gulf of Georgia Cannery Society Archives 1998.006.002/8

Greenwood Cannery

1899-1902

49°11'58.0"N 123°07'57.5"W
  • Built in 1899 in Marpole area of Vancouver by Greenwood Canning Co. Ltd.
  • Acquired and closed by BC Packers Association in 1902
Cannery building with net racks and nets in the foreground

Great West Packing Co. in Steveston. Gulf of Georgia Cannery Collection G2005.046.026

Great West Cannery | Alexander

1906-1956

49°07'10.1"N 123°09'56.8"W
  • Built in 1906 in Steveston by the Great West Packing Co.
  • Called Alexander Cannery by Japanese workers after company owner George Alexander
  • Operated one canning line for 51 years
  • Nelson Brothers Fisheries bought the cannery in 1956, closed it, and used the building as a net shed
Goose Bay cannery complex and landscape viewed from the water.

The Goose Bay Cannery was the last cannery at Rivers Inlet to process salmon. Gulf of Georgia Cannery Society Archives G2004.039.027

Goose Bay Cannery

1926-1957

51°22'48.3"N 127°39'43.8"W
  • Built in 1926 at Rivers Inlet by the Standard Packing Co.
  • Cannery was moved in 1927 due to a teredo worm infestation in the pilings
  • Sold in 1928 to the Canadian Fishing Co.
  • When it closed in 1957 it was the last operational cannery at Rivers Inlet
Monochromatic label featuring a salmon.

Can label for Fraser River salmon canned by the Fraser River Industrial Society. Gulf of Georgia Cannery Society Archives G2001.040.001

Glenrose Cannery | Fraser River Industrial

1896-c.1980s

49°09'41.9"N 122°56'07.6"W
  • Built in 1896 in Surrey by the Fraser River Industrial Society
  • Co-operatively owned by fishermen until 1901
  • Re-opened by BC Packers Association in 1909 as the Glenrose Cannery
  • The cannery was constructed on an archaeological site that documents one of the earliest human habitation in the Lower Mainland
  • The buildings were demolished in 2011 to make way for the South Fraser Perimeter Road
Cannery buildings in the distance. Water in the foreground.

Glendale Cannery buildings, 1932. Image NA-11018 courtesy of the Royal BC Museum and Archives

Glendale Cannery | Knight Inlet

1907-1946

50°40'33.1"N 125°44'10.2"W
  • Built in 1907 by Richard E. Gosse at the mouth of the Knight Inlet
  • In 1910 the building was moved to Glendale Cove and the cannery was renamed
  • Operated until 1946 when the gillnet and seine facilities were moved to Alert Bay
  • Dismantled in 1954
Buildings scattered across a flat expanse of land that is mostly barren.

Steveston, 1890. Garry Point Cannery in the background, before a boom in the industry that would result in a line of canneries along the Steveston waterfront. Gulf of Georgia Cannery Society Archives G2005.046.028

Garry Point Cannery

1889-1893

49°07'27.7"N 123°11'14.8"W
  • Constructed in 1889 by George Hobson and Charles Windsor in Steveston
  • Sold to the Anglo-British Columbia Packing Co. in 1891
  • Destroyed by flood in 1893
  • Site was purchased by Charles Windsor for $5,000
  • Gulf of Georgia Cannery was later built on the same site in 1894
Fisherman is hoisting a salmon with a peugh. Standing on the side of a small gillnetter

Fishing salmon on the Fraser River, 1952. Image I-27850 courtesy of the Royal BC Museum and Archives.

Fraser River Cannery

1897 - unknown date

49°11'12.0"N 123°12'29.8"W
  • Built in 1897 on Sea Island on the North Arm of the Fraser River by McPherson & Hickey
  • Ownership was transferred to Canadian Canning Co.
  • Acquired by Gosse-Millerd in 1914
 
Large vessel moored in front of the cannery buildings at Ferguson Bay

Converted lumber schooner Laurel Whalen was used as a floating cannery. The image shows it moored at the Ferguson Bay Cannery, 1928. Image D-09060 courtesy of the Royal BC Museum and Archives

Ferguson Bay Cannery

1922-1929

53°40'20.6"N 132°16'54.9"W
  • Built in 1922 by Somerville Cannery Co. on Haida Gwaii
  • Acquired by BC Packers Ltd. in 1928 and closed the following year
  • Site was taken over by Wallace Fisheries in 1934 and abandoned
Two figures on the beach at low tide in front of the English Bay Cannery.

English Bay Cannery site, west of Baywater Street, 1907. Image Bu P110 courtesy of City of Vancouver Archives

English Bay Cannery

1898-1905

49°16'22.6"N 123°11'45.1"W
  • Built in 1898 at the foot of Bayswater Street in Vancouver by Malcolm, Cannon & Co.
  • Acquired in 1899 by the United Canneries Ltd.
  • Closed in 1905 possibly because area residents were offended by the smell
  • Lumber from the cannery buildings was used to repair cottages on the shore
Red, black, and white label features a salmon image.

Illustrated can label for English & Co.'s Fraser River salmon in their signature Phoenix Brand. Gulf of Georgia Cannery Society Archives G2003.024

English & Co. Cannery | Brownsville

1877-1883

49°12'12.7"N 122°53'42.1"W
  • Built in 1877 by English and Co. at Brownsville across from New Westminster on the Fraser River
  • Canned twice as much as other plants in 1877 due to large fishing fleet and diverse methods of acquiring fish
  • Main operations moved to the Phoenix Cannery in Steveston in 1883
Wooden buildings on pilings with water in the foreground.

Nelson Brothers Fisheries’ Ecoole Camp at Barkley Sound. Image BC_1532_1368_001 courtesy of UBC Special Collections

Ecoole Cannery

1916-1946

48°58'08.8"N 125°01'22.0"W
  • Built in 1916 in Barkley Sound on the west coast of Vancouver Island by Butterfield, Mackie, and Basterechea
  • The site operated as a herring saltery and cannery for herring and salmon
  • Purchased by BC Packers Ltd. in 1937 and sold to Nelson Brothers Fisheries in 1942
  • Dismantled in 1946
Group of cannery workers standing outside. Two female workers are wearing overalls and have their hands in their pockets.

Group of people standing outside the Eagle Harbour Cannery. Image 541.WVA.THO courtesy of the West Vancouver Archives.

Eagle Harbour Cannery | National

1901-1918

49°21'08.5"N 123°16'16.2"W
  • Built at Eagle Harbour in West Vancouver by the National Canning Co.
  • Cannery buildings burned down in 1910
  • Purchased by the Eagle Harbour Packing Co. around 1912
  • Cannery experienced financial difficulties and closed around 1918
Label features a salmon and a sailor with a bright red background.

Intricate can labels, like this one from the 1900s, were designed to stand out on the shelf, and tell the customer how fresh the salmon inside is. Image I-61103 courtesy of the Royal BC Museum and Archives

Douglas Cannery

1882-1883

54°59'07.4"N 129°41'02.4"W
  • Built in 1882 on the Nass River by Douglas Packing Co.
  • Operated only two seasons before it closed
  • Plant was dismantled in 1888 and equipment was moved to Mill Bay
  • Somerville Cannery was built on the same property in 1918
Dominion cannery and surrounding landscape

Dominion Cannery viewed from across the Skeena River, 1926. Gulf of Georgia Cannery Society Archives G2001.009.012B

Dominion Cannery

1906-1928

54°10'55.6"N 130°15'36.3"W
  • Built in 1906 on the Skeena River by Malcolm, Cannon and Co. on property leased for 21 years
  • Lease re-assigned to the BC Packers Association of New Jersey in 1909
  • Closed in 1928
Can label features a red rose design.

The muted colours of this can label are not typical of others in the 1900s. Moss Rose Brand, British Columbia. Image I-61319 courtesy of the Royal BC Museum and Archives

Dinsmore Island Cannery

1894-1913

49°10'38.4"N 123°09'25.7"W
  • Built in 1894 on Dinsmore Island in the Fraser River by the Dinsmore Island Canning Co.
  • Acquired by the BC Packers Association in 1902
  • Operated only every fourth year during dominant Sockeye salmon runs between 1905 and 1913
Can label features a maple leaf and salmon image.

Delta Canning Company label, 1900s. The red background of this label is meant to remind customers of the red colour of the salmon meat inside. ca 1900. Image I-61084 courtesy of the Royal BC Museum and Archives

Delta Cannery

1878-1895 and 1899-1902

49°05'39.3"N 123°05'07.7"W
  • Built in 1878 by the Delta Canning Co. next to Ladner’s Landing on the Fraser River
  • Canned salmon with distinctive Maple Leaf Brand
  • Idle between 1895-1899 under the ownership of the Victoria Canning Co.
  • Acquired and closed by the BC Packers Association in 1902
Large plume of dark smoke is rising from a cannery building.

View of fire at Deep Bay Cannery May 1, 1937. Image UBC_1532_1323_001 courtesy of UBC Special Collections

Deep Bay Cannery

1918-1937

49°27'52.1"N 124°43'56.2"W
  • Built in 1918 at Baynes Sound on Vancouver Island by Deep Bay Packing Co. Ltd.
  • Destroyed by fire in 1937
  • BC Packers Ltd. bought the property and operated a dogfish liver oil plant there after 1940
Dock at Curry-McWilliams with net racks and one small building.

The Currie McWilliams fish camp as it appeared in 1977, when it was being used as a camp for Imperial Cannery. Gulf of Georgia Cannery Collection G2004.008.008.045

Currie-McWilliams Cannery | Fowler

1897-1920

49°05'45.4"N 123°08'42.6"W
  • Established in 1897 on Westham Island by Currie-McWilliams and Co.
  • Purchased by the BC Packers Association in 1902
  • Property was used as a camp for Imperial Cannery after the buildings burnt down in 1920
Five figures in a canoe in front of the Croasdaile Cannery.

A large canoe is paddled in front of Croasdaile Salmon Cannery in 1882. Image B-03546 courtesy of the Royal BC Museum and Archives

Croasdaile Cannery

1881-1884 and 1888-1895

54°59'07.4"N 129°41'02.4"W
  • Established in 1881 on Reserve #10 on the Nass River by Henry Croasdaile
  • The cannery closed in 1884
  • The buildings were dismantled in 1888 and moved to Nass Harbour for better access by steamships
  • Operated at Nass Harbour until 1895
  • This location continues to be significant for oolichan fishing
Aerial photograph of the Steveston waterfront with cannery buildings and boats

Great West, Nelson Bros. and Colonial Canneries, Steveston waterfront. 1960. Image 1977-22-25 courtesy of the City of Richmond Archives

Colonial Cannery

1897-1913

49°07'08.6"N 123°09'49.9"W
  • Built in 1897 on the Steveston waterfront by the Colonial Packing Co.
  • Bought in 1901 by the Kwong Man Tai Company
  • Acquired by the BC Packers Association in 1902
  • Operated only every four years between 1905 and 1913 during the dominant Sockeye salmon runs
  • Only cannery on the Steveston waterfront to have been owned by a Chinese company
Workers standing at work stations inside a cannery.

Interior of Cleeve Cannery. Percy Venables is seen on the right. He was the local manager of the Cleeve Canning Co. Ltd. until B.C. Packers acquired it in 1903. Image 790 courtesy of New Westminster Heritage Society.

Cleeve Cannery

1897-1909

49°12'20.5"N 122°54'06.2"W
  • Built in 1897 in New Westminster by the Cleeve Canning and Cold Storage Co.
  • Company owned by Irish baronet Sir Thomas Cleeve
  • Purchased by the BC Packers Association in 1902
  • Plant closed in 1909
A collection of small and large buildings on a point of land with canoes on the beach.

Clayoquot Cannery complex. Image B-08611 courtesy of the Royal BC Museum and Archives.

Clayoquot Cannery | Kennfalls | Brewster’s

1895-c.1940s

49°08'36.2"N 125°40'10.4"W
  • Built in 1895 at Clayoquot Sound by the Clayoquot Fishing and Trading Co.
  • By 1901 it was producing seven thousand cans annually and had expanded its market to Japan
  • Taken over in 1902 by the newly formed Clayoquot Sound Canning Co. (H.C. Brewster, J.L. Beckwith, A.G. McGregor)
  • Managed by H.C. Brewster until his death in 1918
  • Site was abandoned in the 1940s
Claxton Cannery buildings in the distance viewed from the water.

Claxton Cannery buildings, c. 1890. Image F-06161 courtesy of the Royal BC Museum and Archives

Claxton Cannery | Royal Canadian

1892-1945

54°04'48.3"N 130°05'21.2"W
  • Built in 1892 at the mouth of Claxton Creek by the Royal Canadian Packing Co.
  • Named for F.J. Claxton of the Royal Canadian Packing Co.
  • By 1923 it had two full canning lines with five retort ovens, cold storage, boiler house, blacksmith forge, store and a post office
  • Closed in 1945 and used as a seine loft for British Columbia Packers Ltd. until 1949
  • It operated as a cannery for 52 seasons
Workers standing in front of a wooden boat shed preparing to bring a boat into a dry dock.

Workers pull a boat, with the name “Uchuck Vancouver BC” painted on the stern, into a dry dock near the Celtic Cannery, c. 1910. Gulf of Georgia Cannery Society Collection 1998.006.001/8

Celtic Cannery | Welsh’s

1897-1917

49°12'58.7"N 123°10'37.2"W
  • Built in 1897 by the Welsh Bros. on the North Arm of the Fraser River
  • Purchased by BC Packers Association in 1902
  • Canned each year until 1905 and every fourth year during the dominant Sockeey salmon runs until 1917
  • Property became a shipyard in 1927
Main cannery building and docks in the distance with the Skeena River in the foreground.

Cassiar Cannery complex, 1926. Gulf of Georgia Cannery Society Archives G2001.009.010B

Cassiar Cannery

1903-1983

54°10'38.2"N 130°10'39.3"W
  • Built in 1903 by the Cassiar Packing Co. at Inverness Passage on the Skeena River
  • Ownership was transferred to the J.S. Macmillan family in 1910 who operated the cannery continuously for 80 years
  • Cannery linked to Highway 16 in 1959
  • Last operating cannery on the Skeena River
  • Sold in 1983 to Ocean Fisheries Ltd.
The Cascade Cannery buildings viewed from across the Nass River.

The Cascade Cannery c. 1890s. Image C-04946 courtesy of the Royal BC Museum and Archives

Cascade Cannery

1889-1893

54°55'09.6"N 129°58'01.4"W
  • Built in 1889 by the Cascade Packing Co. in Iceberg Bay on the Nass River
  • The company, with new partners, became the Victoria Canning Co. in 1892
  • Plant operated until 1893
Captain Cove Cannery and outbuildings at low tide

View of the Captain Cove Cannery from across the water, July 1927. Gulf of Georgia Cannery Society Archives G2001.009.031B

Captain Cove Cannery

1926-1928

53°48'44.3"N 130°13'16.6"W
  • Built in 1926 by the Captain Cove Canning Co. on Pitt Island
  • Acquired by Gosse Packing Co., and shortly after by British Columbia Packers Ltd.
  • Closed in 1928
  • Torn down in 1933 and its lumber was used to build other Skeena River canneries
Cannery buildings viewed from dock.

Capital City Cannery building and wharves, 1913. Image IHP2644-265 courtesy of New Westminster Archives

Capital City Cannery

1906-1914

48°26'05.9"N 123°25'55.2"W
  • Built in 1906 by the Capital City Canning Co. in Victoria
  • Closed and dismantled in 1914
Label features two fishermen in a skiff with a salmon in their net.

Canoe Pass Cannery canned salmon label, c. 1900s. Image I-61106 courtesy of the Royal BC Museum and Archives.

Canoe Pass Cannery | Drysdale’s

1889 - unknown date

49°04'38.3"N 123°07'59.5"W
  • Established in 1889 by Daniel Drysdale at Canoe Pass on the Fraser River
  • Sold to the Anglo-British Columbia Packing Co. in 1891
Several fishing boats at the dock of the Canadian Pacific Camp

Canadian Pacific camp warehouse on the Fraser River, 1977. Gulf of Georgia Cannery Society Archives G2004.008.008.042

Canadian Pacific Cannery | Red | Winch

1893-1924

49°06'58.0"N 123°09'26.4"W
  • Built in 1893 by the Canadian Pacific Packing Co. Ltd.
  • European workers called it Red Cannery because of its colour
  • Japanese workers called it the Winch Cannery after manager R.V. Winch
  • Destroyed by fire in 1924
  • British Columbia Packers Ltd. used the site for wharfage and storage from 1951-1964
Cans are stacked to the rafters inside a wooden building.

Can loft at an unknown cannery. Gulf of Georgia Cannery Society Archives G2002.003.001aa

Bute Inlet Cannery

1890

50°35'32.6"N 124°53'24.0"W
  • Built in 1890 by C.G. Hobson and C.S. Windsor
  • Operated for only one season
Burrard cannery buildings on pilings over the Fraser River.

Burrard Cannery, 1915. Image 1978 34 38 courtesy of the City of Richmond Archives.

Burrard Cannery

1905-1910

49°07'28.6"N 123°11'30.4"W
  • Built in 1905 in Steveston by the Burrard Canning Co.
  • Destroyed by fire in 1910 and was not rebuilt
  • Remaining building operated as a salmon saltery until 1939
Brunswick Cannery buildings in the foreground with a steamship passing by.

Brunswick Cannery at Rivers Inlet. 1927. Image BC_1532_1320_001 courtesy of the UBC Special Collections

Brunswick Cannery #3

1897-1930

51°38'02.0"N 127°33'04.9"W
  • Built in 1897 by Dawson & Buttimer on the north side of Rivers Inlet near the Wannuck Cannery
  • Sold to BC Packers Association in 1902
  • Operated until 1930 when it was closed and used as a fish camp for Wadhams Cannery
Brunswick Cannery buildings viewed from the water.

Brunswick Cannery #2 at Canoe Pass, c. 1910s, Image 1988-049-126 courtesy of the Delta Museum and Archives.

Brunswick Cannery #2

1897-1930

49°04'06.1"N 123°09'22.8"W
  • Built in 1897 by Dawson & Buttimer at Canoe Pass on the Fraser River with profits from Brunswick Cannery #1
  • Purchased by the BC Packers Association in 1902
  • Continued to operate until 1930 when it became a fish camp for Imperial Cannery
Brunswick Camp dry dock, with a sign reading "British Columbia Packers Ltd. Brunswick Camp"

Brunswick Camp, 1962. Image 1985 4 781 courtesy of the City of Richmond Archives.

Brunswick Cannery #1

1893-1902

49°04'06.1"N 123°09'22.9"W
  • Built in Steveston 1893 by brothers-in-law George W. Dawson and Fred J. Buttimer from New Brunswick
  • Purchased and closed in 1902 by the BC Packers Association
  • Operated as a warehouse for the adjoining Imperial Cannery
Hundreds of chum salmon lying on the floor of a cannery.

Salmon on receiving floor of an unknown cannery. Gulf of Georgia Cannery Society Archives 1998.006.002/8

British Union Cannery

1882-1883

49°11'44.8"N 122°54'51.4"W
  • Built in 1882 by the British Union Canning Co. on the Fraser River
  • Closed at the end of the 1883 canning season
The village of Port Essington with the British American Cannery in the background

Looking down Dufferin Street in Port Essington, toward the British-American Cannery. Circa 1920. Image E-01329 courtesy of the Royal BC Museum and Archives.

British American Cannery | Skeena-Ecstall | Boston

1883-1923

54°09'36.8"N 129°57'50.0"W
  • Built in 1883 where the Ecstall and Skeena Rivers meet
  • First named the Boston Cannery after American owner Gus Holmes
  • Sold to the Anglo-British Packing Co. in 1900 and renamed British-American
  • Original building burned down in 1923 and the business moved next door to the Skeena River Commercial Cannery site
Fisherman is hoisting a salmon with a peugh. Standing on the side of a small gillnetter

Fishing salmon on the Fraser River, 1952. Image I-27850 courtesy of the Royal BC Museum and Archives.

British-American Cannery – Fraser River

1882 - unknown date

49°04'43.5"N 123°07'54.0"W
  • Built by the British American Packing Co. in 1882 on the Fraser River
  • Purchased by the Anglo-British Columbia Packing Co. in 1891
Salmon lie on the floor of a cannery. Four workers observe.

Cannery interior c. 1895. S.J. Thompson photographer, Image 74 courtesy of New Westminster Heritage Society.

Boutilier Cannery

1895-1896

49°12'13.6"N 122°54'15.5"W
  • Built in 1895 by Boutilier & Co. in New Westminster
  • Only operated for one year
  • The next year Boutilier opened the London Cannery at Lulu Island
Three skiffs being towed away from the Boswell Cannery complex visible in the background.

Boswell Cannery buildings and boats, 1928. Image BC_1532_1369_011 courtesy of UBC Special Collections

Boswell Cannery

1926-1936

51°21'25.2"N 127°30'25.1"W
  • Gosse Packing Co. built the Boswell Cannery on the Smith Inlet in 1926
  • Ownership passed to BC Packers Ltd. when it merged with Gosse Packing Co. in 1928
  • Cannning operations ended in 1936
  • Buildings used as a fish camp for Namu and Rivers Inlet Canneries until the mid-1950s
Bones Bay cannery buildings and docks viewed from the water.

The Bones Bay Cannery. Gulf of Georgia Cannery Collection courtesy of the Canadian Fishing Company CFC 3-2-1

Bones Bay Cannery

1928-1951

50°35'07.8"N 126°21'18.6"W
  • Jack "Johnny Bones" Dorman established the cannery on West Cracroft Island in Johnstone Strait for the Canadian Fishing Co. in 1928
  • Canning equipment was brought in from the recently dismantled Shushartie Cannery
  • Dorman was the manager at the Bones Bay until its closure in 1951
  • Many Indigenous people from Alert Bay were employed by the cannery
  • Site was later used as a camp for Canadian Fishing Co.'s fishing fleet
Label features bright colours and bold fonts, and an image of a salmon.

Bon Accord Cannery label, c. 1900. Image I-61285 courtesy of the Royal BC Museum and Archives

Bon Accord Cannery | Coquitlam | Haigh’s

1879-1898

49°13'03.2"N 122°48'59.6"W
  • Coquitlam Cannery built in 1879 at Port Mann on the Fraser River by Haigh & Brothers
  • Change of company name to Haigh & Sons led to the cannery being called “Haigh’s”
  • The Haigh company reorganized again in 1883, became the Bon Accord Fishery Company
  • In 1883 Haigh donated part of the land at Port Mann for the first salmon hatchery, also called Bon Accord
  • Cannery closed in 1898 and the site was abandoned
Scale drawing of the cannery site. The description "Blind Channel Cannery and Shingle Mill Upper Thurlow Island surveyed 12th July 1923. Plan Dept. British Columbia Fire Underwriters Assoc." written on the map.

Fire plan for the Blind Channel Cannery complex from 1923, with buildings and watersources identified. The plan for the on-site shingle mill has been included, as well as the temporary school. Gulf of Georgia Cannery Society Archives G2009.016 Plan 5

Blind Channel Cannery

1917- c.1935

50°24'47.1"N 125°30'04.3"W
  • Established in 1917 in Johnstone Strait by the Quathiaski Canning Co. on Thurlow Island
  • A shingle mill was also built on the property
  • Sold and converted to a saltery around 1935
  • Closed when its Japanese owners were interned during WWII
Aerial view of commercial buildings and boats in Vancouver's Coal Harbour.

In 1937, Coal Harbour was busy with commercial boats and warehouses. Image I-30073 courtesy of the Royal BC Museum and Archives.

Bidwell Cannery

1928-1964

49°17'36.8"N 123°07'47.8"W
  • Francis Millerd obtained a permit to build a cannery at Coal Harbour in Vancouver in 1928
  • Vancouver Parks Board protested the development, property owners favoured it
  • Operated by BC Fishermen's Cooperative 1930-31, with Millerd as manager
  • Cannery was purchased and modernized by Queen Charlotte Fisheries in 1935
  • Dismantled in 1964 to make room for apartment buildings
Scale plan of cannery showing buildings and wharves.

Site map of the Bella Coola Cannery located in Bella Coola B.C 1945. Image 2001 34 3 245 courtesy of the City of Richmond Archives.

Bella Coola Cannery | Clayton’s

1900-1936

52°22'26.8"N 126°47'24.2"W
  • Established at Bella Coola in 1900 by John Clayton
  • Sold to BC Packers Association in 1902
  • Operated until 1936 then used as a fish camp for Namu Cannery
Cannery buildings in the distance across the water. "Cannery at Bella Bella" written at the bottom of the image.

The Bella Bella Cannery complex on Denny Island in the 1920s. Image D-06012 courtesy of the Royal BC Museum and Archives

Bella Bella Cannery

1912-1931

52°09'17.9"N 128°07'41.0"W
  • This central coast plant was developed in 1905 by Japanese owners as a clam and abalone cannery and salmon saltery
  • In 1912 East Bella Bella Packing Co. built a salmon cannery on the site
  • Sold to Gosse-Millerd Packing Co. in 1915
  • Bought by British Columba Packers Ltd. in 1928 and closed in 1931
  • In 1938 the cannery buildings were dismantled and moved to Pacofi Cannery
Beaver Cannery and landscape

Approaching the Beaver Cannery in Rivers Inlet on board a ship, April 1948. Gulf of Georgia Cannery Society Archives G2001.009.008A

Beaver Cannery

1906-1941

53°04'51.0"N 129°06'10.9"W
  • Built in 1906 at Rivers Inlet by J.H. Todd & Sons
  • Cannery operated until 1941
  • Site used as a gillnet camp after 1941
Hand-drawn sketch in red ink of the Barnard Cove Cannery site with notes about the site that read "Barnard Cove Cannery- Rough Sketch not to scale"

Barnard Cove Cannery site sketch, not to scale. Image courtesy of the Canadian Fishing Company.

Barnard Cove Cannery

1927-1932

53°04'51.0"N 129°06'10.9"W
  • Built in 1927 on Princess Royal Island by the Millerd Packing Co.
  • Acquired by British Columbia Packers Ltd. in 1928
  • Sold to Canadian Fishing Co. in 1928 and closed in 1932
A worker with a peugh hoists a salmon onto the dock. 1963.

Image I-02566 courtesy of the Royal BC Museum and Archives.

Bamfield Cannery

1919-c.1920s

48°49'49.8"N 125°07'34.1"W
  • Built in 1919 on Grappler Creek on the west coast of Vancouver Island by Bamfield Fisheries Ltd.
  • Built in a low period for the canning industry following WWI
  • Cannery buildings burned down in the early 1920s and were not rebuilt
Balmoral Cannery buildings and surrounding landscape

Balmoral Cannery across the Ecstall River. Cannery housing and shored boats sit along the shoreline. June 1930. Gulf of Georgia Cannery Society Archives 1997.017.015

Balmoral Cannery

1883-1932

54°09'18.7"N 129°56'12.0"W
  • Built in 1883 by John Cuthbert and Richard Stavert Byrn
  • Located where the Skeena and Ecstall Rivers meet
  • Acquired by the BC Packers Association in 1902
  • Large complex with seven canning lines by 1923
  • Plant closed in 1932, was abandoned in 1937, and reverted to Crown property in 1944
Docks and fishing boats at the Atlas Camp. The words "Atlas Camp" are painted on the side of a building in the background.

The B.C. Packers Ltd. Atlas fish camp on the Fraser River, 1977. Gulf of Georgia Cannery Society Archives G2004.008.008.003

Atlas Cannery

1895-1905

49°07'28.9"N 123°11'19.5"W
  • Built in 1895 in Steveston by the Atlas Canning Co.
  • Purchased by the BC Packers Association in 1902
  • Cannery operations ended by 1905
  • Site was used as a camp for Imperial Cannery until 1931, when it was sold
  • In 1935, British Columbia Packers Ltd. repurchased the camp, and used it for its gillnet fleet until the 1980s
Scale drawing of cannery buildings. The words "Arrandale Cannery- Naas River B.C.- Surveyed 21st August 1923 Plan Dept. British Columbia Fire Underwriters Assoc." appear at the bottom of the page.

Fire plan drawing for the Arrandale Cannery complex from 1923, with buildings and water sources identified. Gulf of Georgia Cannery Society Archives G2009.016 Plan 36.

Arrandale Cannery

1904-1942

54°58'34.1"N 130°00'26.0"W
  • Built in 1904 on the Nass River by John Wallace
  • Purchased by the Anglo-British Columbia Packing Co. in 1911
  • Primarily employed Nisga'a people from villages on the Nass River
  • Canning line closed in 1942 and site was then used as a camp for North Pacific Cannery
  • Buildings were abandoned in the late 1950s
Fisherman is hoisting a salmon with a peugh. Standing on the side of a small gillnetter

Fishing salmon on the Fraser River, 1952. Image I-27850 courtesy of the Royal BC Museum and Archives.

Annieville #2 Cannery | Birrell’s B.C.

1878-1891

49°10'33.3"N 122°54'58.5"W
  • Built by the British Columbia Packing Co. in 1878 near the original Annieville Cannery site across from New Westminster on the Fraser River
  • Absorbed by the Anglo-British Columbia Packing Co. in 1891 and renamed the BC Cannery
  • Property was sold to Jens Gunderson the same year
Black and white drawing showing cannery buildings and net wharf.

Scale drawing of the Anglo American Cannery, 1946. Image 2001 34 3 324 courtesy of the City of Richmond Archives.

Anglo-American Cannery

1896-1905

49°04'10.6"N 123°08'40.5"W
  • Built in 1896 by the Anglo-American Canning Co. at Canoe Pass on the Fraser River
  • Absorbed by the BC Packers Association in 1902 and closed in 1905
  • Unused until 1940 when it became a fish camp for Imperial Cannery
Alliford Bay cannery and beach

The Alliford Bay Cannery and moored boats as seen from the shore. Photo taken by the cannery engineer Alec Reid. Gulf of Georgia Cannery Society Archives 1997.009.005

Alliford Bay Cannery

1912-1927

53°12'15.2"N 131°59'21.5"W
  • Built in 1912 on the Skidegate Inlet of Haida Gwaii by BC Fisheries Ltd.
  • Operated a cannery, cold storage, and reduction plant
  • Company was purchased by Maritime Fisheries in 1915 and operated until 1927
  • In 1939 the site became a Flying Boat Station for the Royal Canadian Air Force
Red can label featuring a drawing of the head of a big horn sheep and a salmon.

Big Horn brand can label from the Alliance Canning Co. Image I-61146 courtesy of the Royal BC Museum and Archives.

Alliance Cannery

1895-1902

49°10'32.1"N 123°11'37.0"W
  • Built on Lulu Island in the Fraser River in 1895 by the Alliance Canning Company
  • Absorbed by B.C. Packers Association in 1902
  • Closed in 1903 and made part of the adjacent Terra Nova Cannery
Scale drawing of Alexandra Cannery complex.

Fire plan for the Alexandra Cannery complex from 1923, with buildings and water sources identified. Gulf of Georgia Cannery Society Archives G2009.016 Plan 48

Alexandra Cannery | Alexandria

1904-1915

54°10'19.9"N 129°56'39.5"W
  •  Built in 1904 by the Alexandria Canning Co. where the Ecstall and the Skeena Rivers meet
  • Fully operated by First Nations workers
  • Purchased by British Columbia Packers Association in 1910
  • Canned salmon until 1915
  • Sold to the Millerd Packing Co. in 1937 and abandoned soon after
Three trucks and several people on the wharf at the Alert Bay Cannery. A sign on the building reads "British Columbia Packers Alert Bay Plant."

Busy scene on the wharf at the Alert Bay Cannery, 1946. Gulf of Georgia Cannery Society Archives G2001.009.001A

Alert Bay Cannery

1881-1933 and 1940-1941

50°35'11.3"N 126°55'54.1"W
  • In 1881 the Alert Bay Canning Co. added a canning line to their existing salmon saltery
  • Purchased by BC Packers Association in 1902
  • The plant closed in 1933 but re-opened for two seasons in 1940-1941
  • After 1940 the site operated a store and fish camp for the Imperial Cannery in Steveston
Hundreds of chum salmon lying on the floor of a cannery.

Salmon on receiving floor of an unknown cannery. Gulf of Georgia Cannery Society Archives 1998.006.002/8

Albion Cannery

1899-1917

49°06'44.7"N 123°11'29.1"W
  • Built in 1899 on Albion Island in the Fraser River by Wurzdurg and Co.
  • Ownership transferred to the Albion Canning Co. in 1901, then to the BC Packers Association in 1902
  • Closed in 1917
Hand drawn floor plan showing cannery buildings and wharf.

A hand drawn plan of the Windsor Cannery at Aberdeen showing what the plant looked like in 1891, including buildings and wharf. North Pacific Cannery Archives

Aberdeen Cannery | Windsor

1878-1902

54°12'53.8"N 129°54'57.4"W
  • Built on the Skeena River in 1878 by Charles S. Windsor
  • Sold to the British Columbia Canning Co. in 1889
  • Rebuilt twice after sustaining fire damage in 1895 and 1900
  • Operations ceased in 1902
  • Buildings were destroyed by fire in 1903
  • Cannery had a telegraph office which serviced much of the area
Four cannery bunk houses, two of which are on fire.

After World War II, the remaining Acme cannery buildings, such as these Japanese bunkhouses, were destroyed. Image 2000 15 2 courtesy of the City of Richmond Archives.

Acme Cannery

1899-1918

49°11'07.3"N 123°11'52.6"W
  • Established in 1899 by the Acme Canning Co. at the south-west end of Sea Island on the Fraser River
  • Acquired by BC Packers Association in 1902
  • Canning ended in 1918 after which the buildings were used as a fish camp for Imperial Cannery
Year